junk pole fence

baymule

Sustainability Master
Joined
Nov 13, 2010
Messages
5,934
Reaction score
4,759
Points
363
Location
East Texas
I bet willow would make a good wattle fence. Plant the posts and the willow would take root!
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
2,207
Reaction score
1,965
Points
232
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
But... only if you don't want to be constantly topping it, or having a stand of willow shading out your property, and sucking all the nutrients out of your soil. Those roots travel VERY far! And, it will sucker, perhaps even more so when you top off that living fence.

However, all that "raining on your parade" being said, I saw some fantastic living fences in Guatemala. Very intriguing! I don't know what species they used.
 

flowerbug

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
191
Reaction score
178
Points
84
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
you sure don't want willows as a "lawn" tree, they sure can drop a lot of debris... i like them along the rivers where they belong or at the far edges of the property where nothing cares too much if they shed a few branches...

for a living hedge in a climate that gets some cold weather you can use apple seeds planted in the fall about an inch deep and four inches apart. when they get old enough you can have cider apples from them. they're pretty thorny and won't be easily gotten through after the 2nd or 3rd year. you can get plenty of seeds from saving your apple cores. you might find one of many trees so planted as not only edible but resistant to diseases or bugs. :) wish i could do this here... would have to remove cedar trees or honey suckle bushes to do it.
 

frustratedearthmother

Sustainability Master
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
14,834
Reaction score
6,938
Points
403
Location
USDA 9a
I was browsing some sites the other day and found a discussion on bamboo - the clumping non-invasive kind. DH has wanted some for years and I keep saying NO! But, what I saw (and of course can't find the link now) was about a smaller non-spreading bamboo that you cut the main stalk and it never grows taller and 'supposedly' makes a beautiful hedge at whatever height you choose for it. It did say that you need to trim it once a year. I dunno...
Ideas or opinions?
 
Last edited:

wyoDreamer

Almost Self-Reliant
Joined
Sep 29, 2014
Messages
997
Reaction score
895
Points
187
I think Osage Orange is used for living fences. Planted 1 foot apart, it grows so dense it is "horse high, hog tight, and bull strong". Quoted from an article on Mother Earth News.
 

Britesea

Sustainability Master
Joined
Jul 22, 2011
Messages
4,112
Reaction score
2,233
Points
333
Location
Klamath County, OR
In Europe, Hawthorn was used as living fences. They would weave the branches through as it grew. I've been told that some of those "hedgerows" are well over a hundred years old. They are so strong, that tanks were unable to break through during WWII
 
Top