Lazy Gardener's Little Town Farm

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
4,123
Reaction score
4,728
Points
292
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
Time for the ducks to go to jail. I went out to check on them before supper. They were no where to be found. Usually, all I have to do is call them, and they come on the run. I can hear them answering me as they waddle on, full speed ahead to where ever I happen to be. But... tonight... silence. So, I wandered the perimeter of the property, in the cold (perfect duck weather) rain. Finally, I heard a distant answering quack, and moved towards it. Yep... all 5 of them, with their little ducky feet slapping along... racing down the middle of the road. Apparently, there was not enough action in my yard, so they went down to Red's house. She has a huge American Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I really don't know what "Macaroni" thinks about the ducks. But, if he has a face-to-face encounter with them, I'd like to be present for the "howdy-do's!" Why can't they stay in my 4 acre yard? Where there's lots of slugs, and grubs, and greens, and vernal pools? What more could a duck want? So... it's duck jail for them. I have so many other things that I want and NEED to be doing right now. But, tomorrow will be spent putting up electronet to corral them.
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
4,123
Reaction score
4,728
Points
292
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
It got down into low 30's last night. In the garden, I have a few pole beans just breaking ground, as well as corn and potatoes. Unfortunately, it was warmish yesterday, so I removed their plastic protection. This may be a recipe for the remaining plants to rot before they get sprouted. It's a strange season: has been warmer and dryer overall, yet colder also, if that makes sense! No... I guess it doesn't! Warm enough during the day for short sleeves, so it lulls me into complacency... to uncover stuff... then vicious cold at night.

Today's goal: Finish cutting the 2 remaining cedar slab frames, get them scorched and assembled. (if you're not familiar, do a google for Shou Sugi Ban) They will complete the "tricking out" of the garden. I intend to plant cukes, and some squash in the garden, under milk jugs.

I'm also gonna sow some squash along the perimeter of the yard in spots where past bull dozing/tree work has left some nice piles of forest soil with good color and tilth. I believe that the Seminoles grew massive squash in Florida, using the trees for trellises. I may also plant some raspberry canes in the same soil areas, so that I won't have all my "eggs in the same basket".

If you're not familiar with this guy, he's worthy of your time. He is a nomadic market Gardener, summering on Coastal Maine, and Wintering in FL. He does a lot of successful planting, using the forest edge for berries.
 

henless

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Apr 29, 2018
Messages
76
Reaction score
164
Points
77
Location
East Texas - Zone 8b
I like putting my warm weather crops under milk jugs when I plant them. The greenhouse effect it gives them helps them grow better to me.

Our "last" frost is around March 15th. I put my tomatoes out a few days after this under milk jugs. We had 2 really cold spells since then. Some I had to cover since they had grown to big for the jugs. I used buckets and pots. The last cold spell I used tarps draped over the cattle panels since most of the tomatoes where too tall for even the 5 gallon buckets.

Sometimes you have to plant early, even if it means you have to cover them for a late frost. It gets so hot here that if you wait to long the tomatoes will never produce.
 

CLSranch

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Jul 5, 2018
Messages
119
Reaction score
191
Points
97
Location
NE Oklahoma
fortunately, it was warmish yesterday, so I removed their plastic protection. This may be a recipe for the remaining plants to rot before they get sprouted. It's a strange season: has been warmer and dryer overall, yet colder also, if that makes sense! No... I guess it doesn't! Warm enough during the day for short sleeves, so it lulls me into complacency... to uncover stuff... then vicious cold at night.
Hopefully it was warm and sunny enough to get the soil temp up enough to stay warm until the temps raised back up. Works on grass, tomatoes not so much. Exspecially for the seeds.
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
4,123
Reaction score
4,728
Points
292
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
My grand dtr. will be staying with us from today, through Fri. AM. I intend to put her to use, helping me with this and that in the yard/garden. Projects that might keep her occupied: Digging grubs for chickens and ducks. Keeping chickens supplied with greens. Tying the raspberry canes in place. (should have been done last fall, but trellis system not installed until a couple weeks ago.) Planting cucurbits under milk jugs. Tidying the garden, filling w/b's full of rocks. Digging raspberry offsets for sale. Planting nasturtium and cucurbits in cups for sale. Potting extra tomatoes and peppers for same. I figure I just might turn her into a little market gardener by the time her parents get back!
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
4,123
Reaction score
4,728
Points
292
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
I usually cut the bottom off the jug, and remove the cap. Then, I poke a hole through the top of the handle, so I can insert a stick down through the handle into the soil to anchor the jug in place. (I leave some of the stick or post sticking up through the hole.)

There is also a winter sowing method that I played with just a bit: cut the jug in half, horizontally, leaving an intact area for a hinge. Fill the bottom half with soil, plant your seeds, close the top flap and tape it closed. You can then pretty much ignore it until the seeds decide that the time is "ripe" for them to start growing. I did some sweet peas this way, and really need to transplant them.
 

Latest posts

Top