Magnet Motors and everything else energy?

sunsaver

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I can only stay a minute. The library is closed until Tuesday, and this is my customers computer.

Once the car battery is charge, the alternator continues to produce electricity as you continue to drive the car. Electrolysis is easy to do, producing hydrogen and oxygen which could be burned to theoretically boost mileage. The problem with this idea is that to produce significant amounts of H and O on demand, or at the rate needed to drive a car, you would need a good electrolye, a large, heavy container with many gallons of water, and much more current than could be obtained by an alternator. I believe that most if not all of these hydrolysis cars are bogus.
On the other hand, you can burn water in a water burning car. A man did just this back in the 1970s. When you combine sodium hydroxide, with (sodium silicate?) and water, it produces an exothermic reaction which creates generous amounts of hydrogen and oxygen. Depending on the rate at which the chemicals are combined you can produce more or less, or all at once (explosion). The method is to burn the water and store the silicon waste for recycling. The oxyhydrogen gas is stored in a pressurized tank. This tank is the actual "gas" tank of the car that burns water. This is the only real water burning car that i am aware of. I'm very skeptical of all the other internet claims. It would take tremendous amount of current, like an arc welder, to generate on demand hydrogen by electrolysis.
Hope this was some help. Im not great with chemistry, but i'm sure you can find the hydrogen reaction im talking about if you look online. Good luck! See yall on Tuesday!:cool:
 

TrixR4kids

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What about powering a conventional generator with a Geet Fuel Processor?

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sunsaver

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I'm sure you can easily use paul pantone's patented fuel processor to power any type of internal combustion engine. The ability to use low quality or unrefined fuels to generate electricity would be a great benefit in a Mad Max, SHTF scenario. Or, if you have a cheap or even free source of low quality fuel such as used vegetable oil; then the Geet process would let you capitalize on that free source of fuel.
However; from an environmental standpoint, there are only four types of alternative energy that are known to be truely clean: Solar, Geothermal, Wind, and Hydroelectric power.
 

Joel_BC

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sunsaver said:
I'm sure you can easily use paul pantone's patented fuel processor to power any type of internal combustion engine. The ability to use low quality or unrefined fuels to generate electricity would be a great benefit in a Mad Max, SHTF scenario. Or, if you have a cheap or even free source of low quality fuel such as used vegetable oil; then the Geet process would let you capitalize on that free source of fuel.
However; from an environmental standpoint, there are only four types of alternative energy that are known to be truely clean: Solar, Geothermal, Wind, and Hydroelectric power.
Solar and wind are pretty well out in my locality. When you get further from the equator, you don't even need cloud to limit your solar possibilities during any given year. And, whle we get some very occasional winds lasting, say, 20 minutes that blow limbs off of trees and shingles off of roofs, we don't have any sort of consistent wind or significant breeze.

Geothermal is a possibility, to be sure - not yet utilized enough in my region. Some well-heeled private homeowners have put in installations for it. In my region, retrofit for a home can commonly cost $15-20 thousand, depending on the volume of the bulding. Cheaper if you plan the homesite and build it in to begin with. An substantial electricity-generating type of insallation might work out okay in this region. We have some natural hotsprings, for instance, that offer an abundance of very hot water (a good indicator, I think).

Hydro-electric has been utilized extensively in our region, for public power production. There are two power dams, each within an hour's drive from where I live. Our grid electricity (homeowner rate) costs us $.09/KwH.

Smaller-scale setups on local creeks can be problematic, due to potential disruptions or disturbances to the presence of fish (incl spawning and fry-stage environments). However, sometimes the possibility is not hindered by drawbacks. I've known people who've done it here and also down just below the U.S. border in Washington state.


Wave and tidal power are other clean-energy techs, aren't they Sunsaver? (But not here where I am, 450 miles inland)
 

sunsaver

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I consider wave as essentially wind power, and tidal as hydro (gravity acting on water). Wood, while it does produce CO2, is at least renuable if harvested in a responsible way. If enough new growth of forest is allowed to compensate for the amount of CO2 produced, then the wood powered home is carbon nuetral. Not truely clean, not truely polluting. I harvest only naturally felled wood, unless i plan to replace a worthless tree with a food producing tree. The wood ashes from my stove are used to fertilize the garden, something i don't recomend for the ashes from a nuclear reactor. :lol:
 

Joel_BC

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Sunsaver, has the KwH rate in your locality been an incentive for you (in addition, I mean, to your personal inclination to explore the alternative-energy field)? What is your local grid rate for homeowner electricity?
 

sunsaver

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I'm not sure what the actual rate per kilowatt hour is. I used to know, but that was back when i was on the grid. This past summer one of my neighbors said: "My electric bill was $300! How much was your's?" I simply replied "Zero." I paid cash for a couple of solar panels, changed my lifestyle, ditched all the high-powered appliances, and went off-grid. My average electric bill was $200 per month or about $2,400 per year. Thats about what i spent making the transition to off-grid two years ago, so i figure it has paid for itself already. As for actual incentives: the federal government will pay for 30% of a solar system, and the state of Louisianna will pay for 50%. That means that for the time being, Louisianna residents only have to pay for 20% of their solar system installation. I designed and built my own solar system to be an expandable, off grid system, but most residential solar rigs are grid-tied.
 

Joel_BC

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sunsaver said:
As for actual incentives: the federal government will pay for 30% of a solar system, and the state of Louisianna will pay for 50%. That means that for the time being, Louisianna residents only have to pay for 20% of their solar system installation. I designed and built my own solar system to be an expandable, off grid system, but most residential solar rigs are grid-tied.
That's very cool. :cool:
 

TrixR4kids

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You guys are awesome! So much knowledge here!

I'm just learning all this stuff myself, having recently purchased a little piece of property on 15 acres in the middle of nowhere.

The dream is to be self sufficient as much as possible and to get off the grid to the extent that is possible.

:)
 

sunsaver

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15 acres isn't small! I have only 9/10ths of one acre, and its enough to produce all the fruits and veggies i can eat, plus firewood. There's lots of info here on self sufficiency. I hope you enjoy your journey, TR4K. I'm always willing to help whenever i can. Organic gardening and cooking, and green technology are my specialties. But there are experts on cheese making, animal husbandry, homemade everything. So if you are interested in being independent and self sufficient, you've come to the right place.:)
 
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