Manual Laundry

k15n1

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Dont worry about heavy bedding... thats what sheets are for.
 

Denim Deb

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Glad to see I'm not the only one that doesn't wash their clothes after one wearing. Normally, I'll wear jeans for at least a week B4 getting a clean pair, sometimes even longer. It depends on how dirty they get. And, it's not unusual for me to wear a shirt for a few days, especially in cooler weather. I wear a white t under it, so unless it's gets dirty, it doesn't smell. The t-shirt absorbs the body odor.

And, at this time of year, I normally wash my hair on Wednesdays and Saturdays. There are also days when other than stinkier body parts, I don't get wash everyday. I do have my battery operated shower that I use at the farm and for camping, and can get a shower and wash my hair w/that using less than 3 gallons of water. And, if you save the water that you run when you're trying to get hot water, then heat it up on a wood stove, you save water and electricity that way.
 

k15n1

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Britesea said:
Aprons and pinafores (especially for children) were very popular in the old days, because they were quick and easy to wash and dry compared to other clothes. You could quickly switch to a clean one in the event of unexpected company. Most people only had 3 outfits- 1 for Sunday and 2 for every day, which were worn for a week and then washed while the 2nd everyday outfit was worn. They wore underarm pads to protect their dresses and shirts from sweat. You washed "that" area every night with clean water, bathed once a week, and washed your hair once a month.
We're busy these days and taking a shower every day just takes too long. Instead, I've been experimenting with a wash cloth to clean up before bed, and that's been OK. Doesn't take too long and, by DW's own admission, I'm not smelly. I'm not going to go into the details of what needs cleaning and what the order should be---you can figure that out on your own.
 

ORChick

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Re: bedding ... When I was first married I lived in Germany. Everybody used (uses) duvets, and these would (when possible) be hung over the balcony railing or out the window every morning to air out. They were contained in duvet covers ... essentially large pillow cases ... which could be removed for washing. The covers were washed, not the duvets themselves (or they were, just not as often; they had heavy winter duvets, and lighter summer ones, so were probably washed at season's end ... or maybe just more thoroughly aired; I don't know, but I can't imagine the bigger ones fitting even in an American washing machine much less a European one. I don't think I ever washed the one that we had, just changed the cover). Beds were made up with a bottom sheet and a duvet ... the cover acting as the upper sheet. Made for easy bed making ;). My DH's aunt didn't have the feather comforter type of duvet; she just used regular blankets, but also put them inside a duvet cover. I still make my beds this way, though often I will have a separate sheet between the duvet and the bed. My feather comforters are lightweight, so in winter I'll add another blanket or two. (And, I have washed the *duvet* part of the duvet ... and it is a pain even with a washing machine. Unfortunately, the cats like to sleep with us ... even when they aren't feeling well ... and occasionally their dinner will rebel ... and the bedding needs to be washed ...:rolleyes:) My point being, covers are easier to wash than blankets, whether in a machine or by hand.
 

moolie

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ORChick said:
Re: bedding ... When I was first married I lived in Germany. Everybody used (uses) duvets, and these would (when possible) be hung over the balcony railing or out the window every morning to air out. They were contained in duvet covers ... essentially large pillow cases ... which could be removed for washing. The covers were washed, not the duvets themselves (or they were, just not as often; they had heavy winter duvets, and lighter summer ones, so were probably washed at season's end ... or maybe just more thoroughly aired; I don't know, but I can't imagine the bigger ones fitting even in an American washing machine much less a European one. I don't think I ever washed the one that we had, just changed the cover). Beds were made up with a bottom sheet and a duvet ... the cover acting as the upper sheet. Made for easy bed making ;). My DH's aunt didn't have the feather comforter type of duvet; she just used regular blankets, but also put them inside a duvet cover. I still make my beds this way, though often I will have a separate sheet between the duvet and the bed. My feather comforters are lightweight, so in winter I'll add another blanket or two. (And, I have washed the *duvet* part of the duvet ... and it is a pain even with a washing machine. Unfortunately, the cats like to sleep with us ... even when they aren't feeling well ... and occasionally their dinner will rebel ... and the bedding needs to be washed ...:rolleyes:) My point being, covers are easier to wash than blankets, whether in a machine or by hand.
I grew up with feather and wool duvets as well, and we still use them. One of my most special wedding gifts was a home made wool-filled duvet that my Oma made for us--it's beautiful and very warm in winter yet cool in summer. :)

Same story as ORChick--we just have a bottom sheet and duvet cover as our bed sheets and wash these. I've washed feather duvets before but they take forever to dry and don't need it very often, wool duvets can't be washed as far as I know and I don't like dry cleaning so we've never washed our wool duvets.
 

Liz Demag

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Manula laundry can stink to do sometimes especially with a teenage boy aorund that changes his clothes 5 times a day and throws them in the hamper even though he's worn themfor grand total of 20 mins... if that... but it is really rewarding and when you don't have a bill for electricity for the washer and dryer it's really a wonderful feeling!
 

Beekissed

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Liz Demag said:
Manula laundry can stink to do sometimes especially with a teenage boy aorund that changes his clothes 5 times a day and throws them in the hamper even though he's worn themfor grand total of 20 mins... if that... but it is really rewarding and when you don't have a bill for electricity for the washer and dryer it's really a wonderful feeling!
Suggestion~the boy will promptly change his ways if HE is the one having to do the manual washing of his own laundry...this I can almost guarantee. ;) My elder and youngest did the same thing until I would sort their laundry separately from the family's and require they did their own laundry. The total amount of their clothing hitting that dirty laundry basket decreased drastically and immediately.

As a single mom of three boys I often had to deal with their wastefulness, their sloth and their natural feelings of entitlement....for some reason this is just the hallmark of teens or just males, I don't know. The only way to break this cycle or instill any sense of responsibility for their actions, I have found, is to require they do their own laundry, dishes, cleaning, etc. Also they can do their own cooking.

One example of my methods is this: I don't buy store bought bread and really enjoy making my bread by hand but noticed that as quick as I could make it, it would disappear. Found out that when all other quick meals were depleted, my boys would often eat several pieces of bread with honey and peanut butter, PB&J or tuna fish salad sandwiches~whatever was quickest to shove in their mouths and without having to cook~whenever they got home from school(while I was still at work).

I made a rule that whoever ate the most bread had to make the next batch. They all got very proficient at making homemade bread~even better than my own in some cases~and the bread consumption slowed down drastically to a more normal rate of consumption.
 

moolie

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Totally ditto Beekissed :)

I have teenage girls, but they've been doing their own laundry since they were 12. Additionally, they have to work together to get it done, because neither of them has enough clothes to do a load on their own. They wash their own clothing, bedding, and towels--in appropriate colour/fabric loads. If they run out of anything, they know it's their own fault for not getting the task done. We do have a washing machine, but don't use our dryer for much at all unless it's raining.
 

Joel_BC

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Beekissed said:
As a single mom of three boys I often had to deal with their wastefulness, their sloth and their natural feelings of entitlement....for some reason this is just the hallmark of teens or just males, I don't know. The only way to break this cycle or instill any sense of responsibility for their actions, I have found, is to require they do their own laundry, dishes, cleaning, etc. Also they can do their own cooking.
You're onto something about teens & especially teenage males, I'd say. I realize I'm making a sweeping generalization.

My mom didn't let me cook (thought we boys made too much of a mess of the kitchen)... which turned out to be my loss. I cooked as a teen on camp-outs and on a BBQ grill, but eventually, in my early/mid 20s, I did start to learn to really cook. But the more general motivator for me was money. My folks couldn't afford to buy me any articles of clothing beyond the basics, so when I wanted something other than that, I had to get a job. And then I wanted to buy parts to build my own motorscooter ("mini-bike")... again no $$ support from my folks. So I got yard-boy jobs, and eventually started washing storefront windows in the downtown, about two miles away. Direct feedback via personal reponsibility.
 

SSDreamin

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Beekissed said:
Liz Demag said:
Manula laundry can stink to do sometimes especially with a teenage boy aorund that changes his clothes 5 times a day and throws them in the hamper even though he's worn themfor grand total of 20 mins... if that... but it is really rewarding and when you don't have a bill for electricity for the washer and dryer it's really a wonderful feeling!
Suggestion~the boy will promptly change his ways if HE is the one having to do the manual washing of his own laundry...this I can almost guarantee. ;) My elder and youngest did the same thing until I would sort their laundry separately from the family's and require they did their own laundry. The total amount of their clothing hitting that dirty laundry basket decreased drastically and immediately.

As a single mom of three boys I often had to deal with their wastefulness, their sloth and their natural feelings of entitlement....for some reason this is just the hallmark of teens or just males, I don't know. The only way to break this cycle or instill any sense of responsibility for their actions, I have found, is to require they do their own laundry, dishes, cleaning, etc. Also they can do their own cooking.

One example of my methods is this: I don't buy store bought bread and really enjoy making my bread by hand but noticed that as quick as I could make it, it would disappear. Found out that when all other quick meals were depleted, my boys would often eat several pieces of bread with honey and peanut butter, PB&J or tuna fish salad sandwiches~whatever was quickest to shove in their mouths and without having to cook~whenever they got home from school(while I was still at work).

I made a rule that whoever ate the most bread had to make the next batch. They all got very proficient at making homemade bread~even better than my own in some cases~and the bread consumption slowed down drastically to a more normal rate of consumption.
Would you be willing to write a book?! I'd be first in line to buy it!!! :D My 12 yr old son thinks I am the maid (and I promise, I have insisted he do things for himself since age 8 - he USED to cook, clean, wash dishes and has done his own laundry). He has taken to talking down to me, and being VERY insulting. :barnie
 
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