1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Official SS Poll: What do you do to eliminate bills / cut down expenses?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Help this member, He is in the Kitchen! - Discussion Threads
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  4. SS Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice

Many hens few eggs

Discussion in 'Poultry' started by CrealCritter, Dec 30, 2018.

  1. Jan 9, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Almost Self-Reliant

    Joined:
    May 14, 2017
    Messages:
    329
    Likes Received:
    304
    Trophy Points:
    122
    Location:
    Central Maine
    My Buck Eye attacked me out of the blue last summer when I went out to tend the flock. I was wearing bright red jammie pants. Now, my words say that I should have killed him right then and there. And I was mad enough that I would have killed him if I could have caught him right away. But, by the time I caught him, I was exhausted, and realized that if I killed him, there would be no more chicks. So, I put him through @Beekissed school of ettiquette. After that, he would run in the opposite direction when ever I tended birds. Since then, I give a few lessons in roo manners to any cockerels in my flock, no matter how well they are behaved.
     
    Beekissed and Rammy like this.
  2. Jan 10, 2019
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Messages:
    2,566
    Likes Received:
    2,807
    Trophy Points:
    227
    Location:
    Zone 6B or 7 can't decide
    I'll be the first to admit, a chicken hen that rides on your head and waits at your feet to be picked up and held is highly unusual. Something just ain't right with that girl. But I've grown used to her strange behavior.

    Good news, I collected 12 eggs today. So it looks like they are starting to come out of there strike. I still want some golden comets/sex links though. So I guess I'll pick some up from the farm store this spring when I order some CCX roos.
     
    tortoise and Rammy like this.
  3. Jan 10, 2019
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2015
    Messages:
    2,311
    Likes Received:
    2,003
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Location:
    coastal VA
    My GD wanted a roo "for a pet" that was (is) aggressive and I had said he'd be soup on the weekend. They have him, he's maybe 3 now. So, now they want a couple hens so he "won't be lonely" :rolleyes: Before I took them 2, I went and set up a pen for him so he and they could socialize FIRST. They were discussing how to get him to the outside run while I went in to set the pen. :th WHAT? Just open the door. I went in and had the folded wire cage by me and put him into reverse. When by the wall, I reached in and snatched him up, so I could trim those spurs -- which were almost grown into his leg. Snipped some and vaselined the top so I can twist off later this week. The look on their faces was priceless! :D I put under my arm while talking & petting, before putting him out, set the pen for inside portion of his area, set up his water/food and walked out. Next day, took 2 hens. Tomorrow night, I'll go get him, finish spurs, set him on he roost, remove temp pen and be done. If he doesn't behave, hens will come out. :pop Wait until hens start laying...:D:cool: I'll need to give GD some training.
     
    CrealCritter and Rammy like this.
  4. Jan 10, 2019
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Messages:
    2,566
    Likes Received:
    2,807
    Trophy Points:
    227
    Location:
    Zone 6B or 7 can't decide
    Are you supposed to trim a roos spurs? I've never done that, both my roos have some long spurs too. I guess I'm the one who needs education.
     
    Rammy likes this.
  5. Jan 10, 2019
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2015
    Messages:
    2,311
    Likes Received:
    2,003
    Trophy Points:
    242
    Location:
    coastal VA
    Depends on the animal. Some owners do it in case they fight between selves and cause damage to another (or them). Many have spurs which just grow out almost straight. This one - wow - they curved up and were heading into the flesh at the point of his knee...One had penetrated the skin on that leg as there was a tiny bit of blood when I cut it. Generally you gently twist them off from where they begin at the leg. His were too hard.

    GD lessons are for her to learn how to be confident to enter the pen with him. They'll need to collect eggs :D

    She's way bigger than me but, not involved with reading an animals body language. Elvis is not a huggy roo! So, she's a little scared of how to handle his aggression. Some is created by their being uncomfortable. Me, I barge in and he knows I'll take him out. :old But, I know what to do to catch them, handle them, etc. She needs "chickens 101". :cool:
     
    baymule likes this.
  6. Jan 10, 2019
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2017
    Messages:
    2,566
    Likes Received:
    2,807
    Trophy Points:
    227
    Location:
    Zone 6B or 7 can't decide
    Gotcha - thanks MH. Both of my roos I have now don't fight, I guess there are plenty of hens for both of them. Both also have long straight spurs, so I'll just leave them for now.

    The heritage RIR roo I had before had dual spurs, two long straight on each leg, one right on top of the other. He looked wicked with those dual spurs but he was calm and gentle, thankfully. He still was tasty either way though.
     
  7. Jan 10, 2019
    Rammy

    Rammy Lovin' The Homestead

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2018
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    84
    Im doing my roosters spurs this weekend. I found a video on youtube on how to do it. I take a pair of pliers and grip it close to the leg, then gently start rocking it back and forth. You will feel it detach. I take it off, then trim the shaft back then apply bloodstop powder to it. I normally do it at night when the chickens are roosting. Been doing it that way for years and never had a problem.
     
  8. Jan 10, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Almost Self-Reliant

    Joined:
    May 14, 2017
    Messages:
    329
    Likes Received:
    304
    Trophy Points:
    122
    Location:
    Central Maine
    How much does it bleed? Could you post a before and after pic?
     
    Rammy likes this.
  9. Jan 10, 2019
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    12,496
    Likes Received:
    5,236
    Trophy Points:
    373
    Location:
    USDA 9a
    I used to do it years ago - haven't done it in a long time. But, after we twisted the hard part off we'd just let 'em go. The inside shaft part dried up and usually just came off on it's own. Lot less messy....:hu
     
    Rammy likes this.
  10. Jan 10, 2019
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2008
    Messages:
    11,899
    Likes Received:
    2,112
    Trophy Points:
    417
    Location:
    Mountains of WV
    If I trim a spur at all, it's merely a nip to the tip and, if I'm feeling fancy, I'll dremel the edge of that down until it's dull and smooth. That's not even had to be done more than a couple of times to any rooster in my flocks. I'm none too concerned with spurs, God gave them spurs for a reason. If they were growing back into their legs I'd trim them but other than that, it's not something that needs done too often.

    Never had to pull a rooster's spurs out/off completely and can't imagine any reason for it in a backyard flock situation.
     
    Rammy and Lazy Gardener like this.

Share This Page