pear harvest

Chic Rustler

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not the biggest harvest ever but its our first! very excited!
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Lazy Gardener

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Lovely. My grafted Seckel pear is about 4' tall this year. Finally putting on some size. I need to cut one of the scion grafts off, so it will have a strong leader. May try air layering the second scion graft before cutting it off next spring.
 

Britesea

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No pears here; I'd like to plant one. We have a peach tree that died and came back from below the graft joint, so I have no idea what is there, although I know it was supposed to be a dwarf. The leaves look like peach, but it's about 4 years old and never had a blossom.
 

Lazy Gardener

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No pears here; I'd like to plant one. We have a peach tree that died and came back from below the graft joint, so I have no idea what is there, although I know it was supposed to be a dwarf. The leaves look like peach, but it's about 4 years old and never had a blossom.
I don't know how difficult peaches are to graft. BUT, if they are as easy as apple trees, it would be a cinch to graft a known variety onto your existing root stock.
 

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No pears here; I'd like to plant one. We have a peach tree that died and came back from below the graft joint, so I have no idea what is there, although I know it was supposed to be a dwarf. The leaves look like peach, but it's about 4 years old and never had a blossom.
If you're up for a fun little challenge, and don't mind waiting an extra year or two for the bounty: You can buy a seedling or root stock pear from a reputable company. I use St. Lawrence Nursery in NY or Fedco Trees right here in Maine. Then, you can graft onto that. Or even more of an "I did it myself" challenge: start some pear trees from seeds harvested from grocer fruit. Grow them on in your garden for a couple of years, then use them as your root stock. Grafting is a fun project, and a great one to have in your "gardener's bag of 'know how' tools".

If I had room for more fruit trees, I'd be scouring the landscape for wild apple trees that seem to be disease and insect resistant, and harvest seeds from them, or do some air layering of those trees, and harvest the air layered plant to use as my root stock for an orchard start up.
 

CrealCritter

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There's a few in there, about like finding waldo though. South side bore fruit, north side nothing that I can see. Last frost got the north side of the tree. A couple more weeks and they should be ready to pick, they are still very hard.
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