1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Official SS Poll: What do you do to eliminate bills / cut down expenses?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Maple Sweet Potato Hash - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  4. SS Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice

Questions about vaccum sealing and long term food storage

Discussion in 'Emergency Preparedness' started by chickenjoe, Nov 10, 2012.

  1. Nov 10, 2012
    chickenjoe

    chickenjoe Power Conserver

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    33
    I have a vacuum sealer how long would bean, rice, wheat or flour last, If I vacuum seal it. Also would I have to put a oxygen asborter in the vacuum sealed food to makeit have a longer shelf life.

    My plan was vacuum seal th food and then put it in a 5 gallon bucket. I just want to know how long the food would last like this.
     
  2. Nov 10, 2012
    moolie

    moolie Almost Self-Reliant

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,741
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    188
    Rice and wheat last pretty much indefinitely as long as they are stored dry, cool, free from vermin/pests, and out of light. 30+ years under optimal conditions.

    Beans shouldn't be stored longer than a year or two, because they get harder and dryer as time goes on, and therefore more difficult to soak/cook.

    Flour goes rancid over time, and it actually doesn't take that long--weeks to months really--no matter how it is stored. It's better to store whole grain :)
     
  3. Feb 5, 2013
    cheepo

    cheepo Lovin' The Homestead

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2011
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    59
    another option to consider for long term dry storage is dry oven canning...

    I am not knocking vacume packaging...do it all the time for some things..

    but if you take all your dry goods,
    put in jars...and put in a 200 degree oven...
    for crackers and cereals, 3o min
    flours rice ect, 1 hr
    take out ONe at a time...
    rub with damp cloth and canning lid..
    will seal...
    then Dry goods ARE good 20 years...

    here is a bit of info...

    http://selfreliantnetwork11.blogspot.ca/2012/04/oven-canning-preserves-dry-goods-for.html
     
  4. Feb 5, 2013
    moolie

    moolie Almost Self-Reliant

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,741
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    188
    Be REALLY careful with this method, the instructions on that page say to use a damp cloth on the rim of the hot jars--this is highly likely to subject the rim of the jar to thermal shock and break the jar.

    Also, don't use this method with anything that contains oils like whole wheat flour or nuts. They'll go rancid from the prolonged heat.

    Way easier and safer would be to use the jar sealing attachment on your vacuum sealer--better for the food quality as well, many nutrients are diminished/damaged by heat.
     
  5. Feb 5, 2013
    ninny

    ninny Lovin' The Homestead

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    83
  6. Feb 5, 2013
    cheepo

    cheepo Lovin' The Homestead

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2011
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    59
    thanks moolie...i will bear that in mind and use a hot damp cloth...

    but, the majority of water is squeezed out is only lightly damp .so don't mark it to much concern
    and yes I should have pointed out...it is not good for nuts, and
    powdered milk dosen't do well and some dehydrated vegies..


    it also kills off any potential existing bug larve
    I really should grind my own wheat
    like you, but haven't found a source...yet..

    really like what it does for cereal and crackers..
    and some baked goods...
    and i am able to portion out more efficiently
    eg...(ok now this is bad, but still love my chips)
    and got some recently from a store close out..
    one bag equals...3 quart jars..plenty enough
    snack, really stretched out my 69 cents

    might not be for everyone, but i think it is good,
    ended up in a reason to build more canning shelves...:lol:
     
  7. Feb 5, 2013
    moolie

    moolie Almost Self-Reliant

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,741
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    188
    I'm actually thinking you don't even need the damp cloth really, you should be able to just put the lid on the hot jar and it will seal. I've done that with soups in the past that I've taken to friends after having a baby or getting out of hospital--pour the hot soup into a jar and place a flat lid on top, it will seal as it cools. I don't do it to "can" the food, but rather just to seal it up in a leaf-proof container that is easy to take to my friend. I don't like plastic containers, and they always leak anyway, so a canning jar here and there works well for that kind of thing and most friends are happy to give them back when they are finished.

    I can see the dry canning working well with packaged foods, because they are already "cooked", but yeah--definitely be careful with anything that will be nutritionally damaged by heat. But I have a jar sealer attachment for my vacuum sealer, and all my bulk stuff is in big buckets, so I've never considered dry canning for us.

    For wheat, check with your local natural foods stores--they will often sell bulk bags. I know Vancouver has at least one location of Community Natural Foods location (which is a local store here in Alberta, but there is one not too far from my sister-in-law in Coquitlam) but I don't know how often you get into the city. I'm also pretty sure there is still a natural/bulk foods store in Chilliwack, as my cousin lives there--that isn't too far from you is it, I think you said once that you live near Hope?

    Otherwise let me know if you want me to pick up a bag or bucket for you (check the pricing on www.bridensolutions.ca, they are local to us) and put it on the Greyhound--cheapest way we've ever found to ship things to family and friends in BC :)
     
  8. Feb 5, 2013
    cheepo

    cheepo Lovin' The Homestead

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2011
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    59
    i ...hadn't thought health food stores, i will look into that
    and thanks for your kind jesture...i agree greyhound, is very reasonable...
    .
    i think the moisture needs to soften the rubber..and in your case the steam would accomplish that

    thease days i get to vancouver about once every 3 months..
    but i used to live in coquitlam many years ago...

    moolie...you would drive by hope on your way to coquitlam..!!!

    .if you are ever planing ..a family visit...
    PLEASE stop in for a meal...
    probably wont be as good as your wonderfully sounding meals
    but better than pay the price of restraunts...
     
  9. Feb 5, 2013
    moolie

    moolie Almost Self-Reliant

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,741
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    188
    I will definitely give you a shout the next time we are heading out that way. It's a super long drive (11 hours) so we don't do it that often, but it would be great to meet you :)
     
  10. Feb 5, 2013
    Icu4dzs

    Icu4dzs Almost Self-Reliant

    Joined:
    May 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Oxygen absorbers are not really necessary in every instance. I got a large bottle (D size) with food grade Nitrogen. I put the food into a food grade bucket and wash out the air with Nitrogen. This should give you a great deal of shelf life. If you "vacuum pack" it first, putting it into a nitrogen environment will make it last a REALLY long time although as Moolie points out, certain things just don't store all that long no matter what you do. Wheat, Honey, and a few others will store indefinitely though with minimal protection, i.e. dry, cool and well sealed from critters who are hungry too!
    Saepe Expertus, Semper Fidelis, Fratres Aeterni
    Trim sends
    //BT//
     

Share This Page