Selling eggs to morons

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
2,224
Reaction score
1,991
Points
232
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
So sorry! What do these people think? You're rolling in the dough by selling eggs? Selling eggs is a labor of love, and there is NO PROFIT in it. Add the labor involved, and they would understand that being allowed to purchase home raised eggs is a luxury.
 

FarmerJamie

Mr. Sensitive
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
5,548
Reaction score
1,011
Points
353
In a previous professional life, I sold 5-10 dozen eggs per week. Never had one issue with any of the city slickers complaining about the price or the occasional flecks of poo. good times. When I left, one of my most loyal supporters was literally in tears, asking where would she get the "good eggs" now?

Only smh moment was one of my regulars going to a weekend market where they saw a sign "free range eggs". They allegedly asked the vendor what "range eggs" were and why were they free. LOL.
 
Last edited:

Beekissed

Mountain Sage
Joined
Jul 12, 2008
Messages
12,323
Reaction score
2,789
Points
417
Location
Mountains of WV
That person has obviously never raised a chicken before. Mine will go out on the "range" here shortly but what's the sense of it during the winter?
Mine glean quite a bit out there, even in the winter. If we have deep snows they will find whatever is sheltering green grass from the snow and graze that green. If there isn't any snow, they are constantly scratching~and finding or they wouldn't bend down to eat it so vigorously~things to eat. If I lived where the soils froze solid all winter it might be a different story, but my birds range all winter and work diligently at it....grass seeds fall and can be found then, pine nut seeds finally turn loose of the cone, bugs hibernating under the leaf layer, various grubs hibernating under the garden soils they can excavate, etc. Consequently, even though depending a lot on supplemental feeding, their yolks remain dark orange all winter long and they get fresh food, exercise and clean soils on which to spread their poop and not having to walk in it again. Lot of benefits to free range in winter if you don't live in the cold, dark and far north states.







Here's a little funny for all who sell their eggs...

 

CrealCritter

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
Jul 17, 2017
Messages
4,002
Reaction score
4,273
Points
277
Location
Zone 6B or 7 can't decide
Mine glean quite a bit out there, even in the winter. If we have deep snows they will find whatever is sheltering green grass from the snow and graze that green. If there isn't any snow, they are constantly scratching~and finding or they wouldn't bend down to eat it so vigorously~things to eat. If I lived where the soils froze solid all winter it might be a different story, but my birds range all winter and work diligently at it....grass seeds fall and can be found then, pine nut seeds finally turn loose of the cone, bugs hibernating under the leaf layer, various grubs hibernating under the garden soils they can excavate, etc. Consequently, even though depending a lot on supplemental feeding, their yolks remain dark orange all winter long and they get fresh food, exercise and clean soils on which to spread their poop and not having to walk in it again. Lot of benefits to free range in winter if you don't live in the cold, dark and far north states.







Here's a little funny for all who sell their eggs...

The video is so true... My in-laws won't eat my eggs they say they are NOT natural :rolleyes:
 

SustainableAg

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Oct 22, 2016
Messages
91
Reaction score
95
Points
87
Location
NE PA
My gosh, this is too funny. The ignorance is astonishing.
Funny story, my grandfather loved brown eggs. He got them from a local farmer, and swore they tasted better than store bought (obviously). My grandmother detested the brown eggs, and refused to eat them. She thought they tasted funny, and actually liked the store bought "white eggs" better! The nerve! :th
 

Beekissed

Mountain Sage
Joined
Jul 12, 2008
Messages
12,323
Reaction score
2,789
Points
417
Location
Mountains of WV
My gosh, this is too funny. The ignorance is astonishing.
Funny story, my grandfather loved brown eggs. He got them from a local farmer, and swore they tasted better than store bought (obviously). My grandmother detested the brown eggs, and refused to eat them. She thought they tasted funny, and actually liked the store bought "white eggs" better! The nerve! :th
I've had quite a few people tell me they don't like the taste of brown eggs. Others don't like the taste of fresh eggs...said they taste too eggy and the yolks are too orange and prefer the pale, tasteless yolks from the store.

And these are country people, though I doubt they were raised on farm foods.

Most prefer the white eggs because they feel they are "cleaner" than the brown eggs.

No need to waste such good food on such willful ignorance, so maybe it's for the best they don't eat them.
 
Top