Selling plants and seedlings

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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I'm literally starting a tree farm, so there's that :). My plan is to plant at least 200 trees each year and sell them in 2 and 4 year stages to customers. My customer base is already built by way of the "it's who you know, not what you know" rule and I already have 50 in the ground from last year. First official sale will be in 2020 after Dept of Ag does their inspection. Spendy to start up for sure, so I hope this is successful :D

Aside from that I've always just started more plants than I need and give them away. I have such a hard time charging money for plants :(
 
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CrealCritter

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I'm literally starting a tree farm, so there's that :). My plan is to plant at least 200 trees each year and sell them in 2 and 4 year stages to customers. My customer base is already built by way of the "it's who you know, not what you know" rule and I already have 50 in the ground from last year. First official sale will be in 2020 after Dept of Ag does their inspection. Spendy to start up for sure, so I hope this is successful :D

Aside from that I've always just started more plants than I need and give them away. I have such a hard time charging money for plants :(

Every year I till under 100's of red maple seedlings in my summer garden. I thought about selling them, but nah... Good luck with sapling sales.
 
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SprigOfTheLivingDead

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I had to look up the Kentucky Coffee tree - it's pretty!

Very pretty. I love the form it grows in, that it has giant kidney beans for seed pods and the fact that it exists still, despite the hardness of its seedcoat which used to get broken down in tthe bellies of mastadons with sand and rocks
 

CrealCritter

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Very pretty. I love the form it grows in, that it has giant kidney beans for seed pods and the fact that it exists still, despite the hardness of its seedcoat which used to get broken down in tthe bellies of mastadons with sand and rocks

Have you ever tried coffee made with the ground roasted seeds of the Kentucky coffee tree? I have and it sucked!

It's extremely bitter nasty stuff. I never drank battery acid before but is suspect it might taste better than coffee made seeds from Kentucky coffee tree.

Not sure where your located but if you could get some Holly seedling started they fetch a pretty penny as saplings.
 

sumi

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Very pretty. I love the form it grows in, that it has giant kidney beans for seed pods and the fact that it exists still, despite the hardness of its seedcoat which used to get broken down in tthe bellies of mastadons with sand and rocks
There is a tree native to the southern parts of Africa that has a similar seed, but it gets passed through the guts of elephants to break down the seed coat. I wish I can remember now what it's called...

Good luck with your business venture! It sounds amazing. We sold many trees and other plants in our garden nursery in S.A. before emigrated. It's fun and rewarding. Especially when you visit customers later and see how the trees are growing for them.
 

Lazy Gardener

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I have not had luck selling seedlings. (haven't really tried.) But, that's on my bucket retirement list. I don't know how well that would work in my neighborhood, b/c I see a lot of plant material out at roadsides, and it does not appear to get any attention.

What I have done is: invite folks to come "shopping" in my flower gardens. I tell them to bring boxes and bags. We go around, I tell them what the various plants are, what their growth habits are, then, I dig divisions from the plants that can use the thinning. Sure, it's labor intensive, and I do not profit from it. But, it's a way to share my gardening passion, and help folks out.

As for seedlings, I usually try to give my extras away. I hate to see a good plant go into the compost pile!

I've also organized plant sales to benefit a South America missions trip. And organized "free" and "plant swap" days at church. The Free days are open to the public. Simply come, and pick up some free perennials and seedlings.
 

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