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Shelling peas

Discussion in 'Gardening On Your Homestead' started by CrealCritter, Nov 18, 2018.

  1. Dec 4, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    I planted a 25 foot row of Alaska a few years ago. They grew and produced quickly and also popped just like you explained too. Never tried Maestro but it seems to be a favorite here. So I think I'll give them a try.
     
  2. Dec 4, 2018
    tortoise

    tortoise Wild Hare

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    I planted Alaska last year also, but they didn't germinate well. We've had a couple poor years for peas in a row here. I am going to try them again next year! I try new varieties [of everything] each year just because. variety is good!
     
    CrealCritter likes this.
  3. Dec 5, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    Alaska - 5 or 6 peas per pod and if I remember correctly they only get about 2' tall. But they are loaded down with pods. Peas, I always plant two or three per hole and thin out to 1. Because your right, peas really don't germinate very well.

    It's always really wet in late winter / early spring. I mostly have to rake up the rows high and trench deep in my spring garden or else most seedlings drown. My spring garden is on a slight two way slope. Higher on the south & east sides. So I have my draninage trench on the west side, that runs north and south down to the creek. I run my raised rows run west to east so the rain drain off into the north / south facing trench. After the spring rains subside I fertlize, cultivate and mulch in-between the rasised rows to conserve water and keep the weeds down.

    Here's what my Alaska shelling peas looked like in spring of 2017 they are on the left, the ones on the right were sugar peas, that we didn't like much. I can't remember the type they we're though. They really spread so they need the rows spaced further than 3' apart like is pictured. So you can get in there and cultivate, weed and pick.
    IMG_20170513_193502557.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018
    tortoise and baymule like this.
  4. Dec 5, 2018
    baymule

    baymule Sustainability Master

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    I think I'll plant green peas in the spring. We love them, but haven't really tried to plant them since we moved.
     

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