Show me your walls

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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... Of your trailer!!!

I recently picked up this beauty of a 16' trailer. I know I could have gone for a shorter utility trailer but I don't have endless cash and I qanted one trailer that could haul some long lumber or some heavy stuff.

20190202_153046_HDR.jpg

Anyways, I want to build some walls for it but haven't ever done that before. My plan is to build the length sections in 8' lengths and then remove the tool box, since it's right up against the edge, so I can put a wall there. When I redo the floor I'll put the toolbox back on. Then build the back as two swinging gates.

My main queations are:
  1. How tall should I make the walls? 18"? 20"? 24"?
  2. Should I option for pressure treated deck boards rather than pine or cedar and then trying to treat it myself?
  3. How big of gaps should I put between the boards? I was thinking a solid wall might just be a kite in the wind so was thinking .5" gaps between the boards would be sufficient
I'm super excited for this :) and need to get it done in the next two weeks so i can then use it to haul some lumber for a Missouri gravel bed I'm building for my young trees.
 

frustratedearthmother

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Do you need solid walls? If not, Have you considered using a different material other than wood? Maybe something like a stock panel or expanded metal that wouldn’t catch as much wind?
 

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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Do you need solid walls? If not, Have you considered using a different material other than wood? Maybe something like a stock panel or expanded metal that wouldn’t catch as much wind?
I was thinking wood just so there was less chance of things finding their way out, despite efforts to tie down. But I'm open to options.

What's expanded metal?
 

Lazy Gardener

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If you built solid frame panels, then put the expanded metal on the frames, that would lighten the overall trailer, I would think. But, the advantage of your wood side panels is that you will have infinite tie down options. I would go for PT at least for the floor boards. I'm not a fan of PT AT ALL! But, in this application, if I were doing it, I'd set my prejudice aside and use PT for the floor.

Will you ever use this trailer to carry animals? If so, you might consider building those side panels with spacing that will not allow an animal to get head or leg caught between the horizontals.
 

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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If you built solid frame panels, then put the expanded metal on the frames, that would lighten the overall trailer, I would think. But, the advantage of your wood side panels is that you will have infinite tie down options. I would go for PT at least for the floor boards. I'm not a fan of PT AT ALL! But, in this application, if I were doing it, I'd set my prejudice aside and use PT for the floor.

Will you ever use this trailer to carry animals? If so, you might consider building those side panels with spacing that will not allow an animal to get head or leg caught between the horizontals.
Yeah, normally i'd keep away from PT but for this application it makes sense.

This won't be used for animals. Just equipment, lumber and other things like that
 

frustratedearthmother

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The expanded metal we used was not- but I believe you can get aluminum these days...we painted ours. It has lasted for years. Remiveable panels will give you infinite options- great suggestion.
 

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