Some seriously amazing ways to prepare/cook food

wyoDreamer

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I like brown sugar, but really don't like anything made with molasses. I know that brown sugar is just sugar before the molasses is pulled out, but don't like molasses. I had a jar of molasses in the cupboard for over 8 years with only about 2 tablespoons used out of it.
 

Britesea

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It lasts a long time. DH is fond of saying it has a half life rather than a shelf life
 

CrealCritter

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I like brown sugar, but really don't like anything made with molasses. I know that brown sugar is just sugar before the molasses is pulled out, but don't like molasses. I had a jar of molasses in the cupboard for over 8 years with only about 2 tablespoons used out of it.

Only because I've been making beer do I know that there is a big difference between light brown sugar and dark brown sugar. Their characteristics when fermented are quite different also. Both are made from real unrefined sugar cane, where as table sugar is made from sugar beets.

Light brown sugar brings forth a molasses buttery or caramelized flavor and notes, though both flavor and aromas are fairly subtle.

Quite versatile. Belgian dubbel and quadruple, pale and amber American ales, barleywine, IPA or Imperial IPA.

Dark brown sugar brings forth molasses and rummy flavors that are quite pronounced and aroma hints of anise and licorice that are very subtle.

Also quite versatile
Dark Belgian ales, old ale, Imperial brown ale, porter, stout, doppelbock, barleywine and Baltic porter.

I recently made two Octoberfest beers. I added 1 lb of light brown sugar in the amber Oktoberfest and 1 lb of dark brown sugar in the dark Oktoberfest. They came out of lagering after 6 weeks @ 35 degrees F and I placed them in kegs, with priming sugar last weekend. At the time of kegging I sampled both and "I" the guy who brewed them could tell the difference which brown sugar I added to the kettle when I brewed both. But my son in law who helped me rack and keg them, could not tell the difference. Although it's true that both have a caramel flavor that is characteristic of an Oktoberfest brew, but the dark also has a slight rummy flavor on top of the caramel flavor which is quite delicious to my taste buds.
 
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Lazy Gardener

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When I was using sugar, I just made up my own brown sugar whenever a recipe called for it. You just mix 2 to 4 Tbsp (depending on how dark you want it) molasses to a cup of sugar. Keep mixing it for a few minutes until suddenly it changes from weird lumpy white sugar to the brown sugar everyone is familiar with. Never had to worry about it getting hard that way.
I don't bother to mix the two together. If making a recipe that calls for brown sugar, I just use less sugar, then drizzle some molasses on top before I finish mixing the ingredients together. But, one thing I DO like brown sugar for: I like to put a bit in my coffee or in iced tea. Much cheaper to buy brown sugar than the natural sugar which comes in the large crystal form.
 

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