The Recycapple Candle

wyoDreamer

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x2 to what @flowerbug said. You have to watch out for temperature with candles. Different waxes and different scents added to the wax will affect how the candle burns. Some burn hotter than others.

Also, I would not advise using 3 taper candles in a jar. That is a lot of heat.

Did you try just one taper candle in a jar with your melted wax mix around it?
 

Nifty

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Thanks! I'll be very mindful of the safety of the situation!

Yeah, good point regarding different types of waxes, etc. There's probably a bit of a mix :hide

Also, I would not advise using 3 taper candles in a jar. That is a lot of heat.
Hmmm... this is really a problem / issue? I thought these jars were made for candles and the high-wax temps, no? (they aren't mason jars, but thick candle jars). Is the worry that the glass will explode or something, or just that the jar will get hot and then be a safety issue with the heat? (the former would be more of a concern than the latter).

Did you try just one taper candle in a jar with your melted wax mix around it?
I thought I had in the past and had issues, but can't remember exactly... I didn't try it this time around, but maybe I should?

I just noticed the big candle has a significantly larger wick... which makes sense. The two taper candles in my smaller jar seem to be doing a mostly good job :)

IMG_20191223_130116.jpg
 

Nifty

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Ugh....

So, back to the drawing board? How hot is "too hot"? I can even use my laser thermometer to get a good heat reading.

I want to be careful, but I also don't want to be making decisions where there isn't really a legit danger.
 

baymule

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I am enjoying this recycle candles thread. I used to burn candles, but can't use any scented anything due to chemical issues. I always had plenty of candles, especially for hurricane season. I think y'all are brilliant for finding ways to reuse the leftover wax in the candle.
 

Britesea

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...Real bayberry is hard to get and expensive. Pale green.
That's because real bayberry only has an extremely thin waxy coating on each berry. You have to cook the berries and then carefully skim the wax off the top- don't want any of the actual berry liquid in there or it won't work right in a candle. You need a LOT of bayberries to make even one candle.

Back in the days of candle light only, you used tallow candles in the kitchen and other out-of-the-way places, and saved your beeswax and bayberry candles for the parlor, or for special occasions.
 

Hinotori

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I repect that something like bayberry is hard to get. You pay for work and rarity of ingredient.

I got the eight inch tapers I have on sale for $10 for 2. It was a good price. I only burn them on special occasions, usually this time of year. Finding someplace that sells the real thing though is horrid. On Amazon too many sellers of "bayberry" candles are selling scented paraffin.

Hubby sent me a video of traditional handmade Japanese candles. From wax tree all the way through. I'm going to order a few of the expensive things so I can try them.
 

flowerbug

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Ugh....

So, back to the drawing board? How hot is "too hot"? I can even use my laser thermometer to get a good heat reading.

I want to be careful, but I also don't want to be making decisions where there isn't really a legit danger.
i would always have a fireproof tray under any candle no matter the reputation of the glass or wax or my thoughts on it.

wood/paper starts getting charred and thinking about burning at 450F+ but may take some time to actually catch. i much prefer to not burn a place down. :) knowing my own clutzyness even if i'm sitting right there with a candle i still don't want it to be near anything else or on any other surface that is flammable without protection. hot wax can hurt and even a small flame can burn badly enough... and by example i mean something like me watching the candle and then deciding to get up for a cup of tea and somehow my foot bumps the table and the candle shakes and falls over or the one bumps into other or ... well i can't always predict how chaos ensues, but it happens...
 

Britesea

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That's one of the main reasons I have olive oil lamps for emergency lights, especially for the bedroom. If they get tipped over, the oil smothers the flame and it goes out. They can give a decent amount of light- enough to read by, and you can use other oils- I've heard of people using castor oil or cod liver oil- although they sound like they wouldn't smell that great. You can use rancid oil too- the fuel itself might stink, but the burning fuel won't. My only problem is that olive trees won't grow here. I plan on experimenting with sunflower seed oil, since I have an oil press and sunflowers grow easily.

Here's some more information about oil lamps and some simple DIY lamp ideas: https://www.primalsurvivor.net/vegetable-oil-lamp/
 

tortoise

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Ugh....

So, back to the drawing board? How hot is "too hot"? I can even use my laser thermometer to get a good heat reading.

I want to be careful, but I also don't want to be making decisions where there isn't really a legit danger.
Depends on the glass. I know mason jars tolerate 90 degrees of thermal shock without cracking.
 
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