'Tree' Bees

Beekissed

Mountain Sage
Joined
Jul 11, 2008
Messages
12,774
Reaction score
3,934
Points
437
Location
Mountains of WV
Thanks Bee!

We don't want someone to come take the bees. It is a very busy tree. Unfortunately the tree is dying and we don't want to see them move on. We have been told that they can't be moved from the tree to a hive. You know me, if I am told it can't be done I will find a way to do it. :)

Good for you! We share that trait. ;) And they were dead wrong.

Are you going to get yourself a hive and start keeping them? I'd suggest it, as these bees are feral and doing very well without meds, extra feeding, etc., which means they can continue to do so without too much intervention on your part. I've been wanting such a swarm or hive for so very long and even have a hybrid Lang/top bar hive built, just ready to receive them.

I will say this...when you move bees successfully it either has to be right next to the hive~as in apiaries when they split a hive into another box, or a mile away, as they will return to the original hive site if not. When you remove this hive, I'd cut the tree down. Then I'd leave them right where it used to stand~you could even keep your stump higher to set your hive on.
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
4,626
Reaction score
5,878
Points
292
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
Lisa, I'd not accept that statement "can't be done" at face value. And, if I was you, I'd be thinking exactly the same thing: My land, MY BEES! I bet, if you're willing to spend the money, you can buy or build a hive, find an experienced bee keeper and pay him to transfer the bees to a hive for you. Of course, I assume that timing is everything, so you'll need to work around that! I also assume that you will need to destroy the tree when the bees are transferred. Could be that when "they say" it can't be done, it's b/c the bees would immediately return to the tree b/c that is home. If THAT's the case, the bees could be hived, then moved out of range of your tree while you destroy the tree, then you could bring your intact and settled hive back.

I have no bee keeping experience, but am interested in the topic, and it may find it's way to the top of my bucket list.

I think it would be awesome to be involved in the capture and hiving of rogue colonies!
 

TexasLisa

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
318
Reaction score
426
Points
217
Location
Texas
Ken and I have talked about getting a hive. We didn't want to go to the expense if they couldn't be moved. We had talked about putting the hive fairly close to the tree and see if they would move over.

This swarm has been here for the last few years. We would see them in the Oak trees in our front yard. Amazing to watch them hover and make that ball. They would stay for a few days and disperse. Last year they went into our eaves. I knew they were flying in and out but had NO idea what they were doing out of sight. hahaha I researched and found a way to remove them without killing them. They left the eaves and moved into the tree.
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
4,626
Reaction score
5,878
Points
292
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
If you were able to move them once, force them to find new digs, it just could be that you could force them to move again. Perhaps get that hive set up, and put it at a nice comfy height. Do bees like to nest high? If I was a bee, I think I would!
 

TexasLisa

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
318
Reaction score
426
Points
217
Location
Texas
LG, sounds like the makings of a poem....If I was a bee

The hole in the tree is about 2 ft. off the ground. The eaves of our house is much MUCH higher (taller than me.) haha
 
Top