What do you forage?

DelcoMama82

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I am south of Houston...

We do have chickweed and purslane all over. A neighbor had a wild persimmon tree and chopped it down...argh!
Wow!
That’s what’s it’s like here too. It seems like all people care about is pretty and ornamental. Fruit falling would be considered too messy and a hassle! Ugh!!!😔
 

Mini Horses

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Blackberry, elderberry, beauty berry. some dewberry that is getting harder to find. Very few fruit as mostly pine or hardwoods in this area. There's always the mullian, purslane, dandelions, ferns, etc. If you know where, there is also some areas with old asparagus growing along ditches. Apparently used to be a "crop" in this area. Now it's mostly feed corn, cotton, wheat, soybean, P-nuts. If you hunt, we have fat & healthy deer, turkey & dove. Plus good fishing with our waterways. Just need a license to partake.
 

flowerbug

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you can try to get your own morels going by taking any rinse water and scattering it around your property. keep doing it and eventually they may show up. :)


purselane is very easy to grow here. i don't try to get rid of it all for that reason. emergency greens in case of the apocalypse. :)
 

DelcoMama82

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Blackberry, elderberry, beauty berry. some dewberry that is getting harder to find. Very few fruit as mostly pine or hardwoods in this area. There's always the mullian, purslane, dandelions, ferns, etc. If you know where, there is also some areas with old asparagus growing along ditches. Apparently used to be a "crop" in this area. Now it's mostly feed corn, cotton, wheat, soybean, P-nuts. If you hunt, we have fat & healthy deer, turkey & dove. Plus good fishing with our waterways. Just need a license to partake.
Sounds awesome. What are beauty berries? Never heard of those.
 

DelcoMama82

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you can try to get your own morels going by taking any rinse water and scattering it around your property. keep doing it and eventually they may show up. :)


purselane is very easy to grow here. i don't try to get rid of it all for that reason. emergency greens in case of the apocalypse. :)
Wow! Very cool!
We have lots of mushrooms around our property, I’ve always been afraid to try any in case they’re not what they appear to be.
 

flowerbug

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Wow! Very cool!
We have lots of mushrooms around our property, I’ve always been afraid to try any in case they’re not what they appear to be.
the only ones i'll eat from the wild are morels. i wanted to get some green wood from a friend to set up some mushroom logs innoculated with known mushroom spawn along the northern hedge (under the honeysuckle bushes would be a good use of that space to get some edibles from there) but it didn't work out so i never have gotten around to it. i think this is a good way to learn about just certain mushrooms and have more safety.
 

Mini Horses

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Beauty Berry is a bush, wild here. Old type that has been used or bug control and animal feed at certain times. It's really pretty and the berry jelly tastes like maraschino cherry syrup, IMO.
 

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Hinotori

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We have a small chunk of land but enough to forage some on and I know where things are down the seldom used railroad tracks.

There are the invasive Himalayan and cut leaf blackberries that we cant eradicate, so I pick them. We also have Pacific training blackberries. Then there are the thimbleberries, serviceberries, salal, Oregon grapes, and Pacific crabapples. Those native apples are tiny things smaller than a dime but make great jelly.

The blackberries I also pick young leaves to use for tea.

I have a stand of cattails I've been trying to encourage so I'm careful how much I take. Nettles grow in several spots.

I collect beaver downed willow and alder trees for kindling. I trim willow for craft use.

Ive been using dandelion and plantain a lot the last few years. I dried a bunch of brackenfern last year but never got around to making a salve with it.

We have hawthorn, but I usually leave all the berries for the wild birds as winter food.

We love to go razor clamming and fishing.

I know there is more but I can't think at moment.
 

DelcoMama82

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We have a small chunk of land but enough to forage some on and I know where things are down the seldom used railroad tracks.

There are the invasive Himalayan and cut leaf blackberries that we cant eradicate, so I pick them. We also have Pacific training blackberries. Then there are the thimbleberries, serviceberries, salal, Oregon grapes, and Pacific crabapples. Those native apples are tiny things smaller than a dime but make great jelly.

The blackberries I also pick young leaves to use for tea.

I have a stand of cattails I've been trying to encourage so I'm careful how much I take. Nettles grow in several spots.

I collect beaver downed willow and alder trees for kindling. I trim willow for craft use.

Ive been using dandelion and plantain a lot the last few years. I dried a bunch of brackenfern last year but never got around to making a salve with it.

We have hawthorn, but I usually leave all the berries for the wild birds as winter food.

We love to go razor clamming and fishing.

I know there is more but I can't think at moment.
I can’t believe there is more, that’s a hell of a lot right there! You’re pretty much living off the land!!!
 

Hinotori

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I'm in the Puget Sound area. The climate is very good for foods. The area from western Oregon up to British is the only place in the world that was able to sustain a sedentary population of hunter gatherers. We have a lot available.

I have comfrey that's gone feral here as well. The wild roses we have don't have good hips so I dont bother.

Mostly I collect berries for a few deserts or jams. We don't have a lot of the other berries anywhere close that I know. I'm thinking of getting some salmonberry starts.

There are some nice turkey tail mushrooms growing in one of the dead fir tree clusters, but they are no good for eating unless they grow on hardwoods. If I get the smokehouse going, all the alder would be good. Just have to strip bark to use the wood.

Alder cones make really pretty decor in vases. As do any of the willows buds cut at the right time.

I have native lupins here I use for decor as well, but the ones in the marsh here get up over 5 foot tall with the flower spikes being up to 3 feet of flowers. Mom didn't believe me until I sent pictures.
 

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