What would you do?

ninny

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I am debating what to do. I know we will be moving in about five years. I can have a poultry flock some dairy goats and rabbits and a huge garden if I want here. But that means spending the money on them. I would get only things that can come with us when we move but should I? If I don't then I put off the hobby farm dream for at least another 6 or 7 years. And my girls won't grow up with on it. So should I? I really want my hobby farm. But what would I do with my raised beds when we moved? Anyway I could take them with me? :hu
 

the funny farm6

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the raised beds i dont know if they could be moved. but the rest shouldnt be too hard to move, you would just have to put up new fencing and move the goats, move the rabbit hutches, and either put up a new chicken coop-or build one that is ment to be moved. 6-7 years is a LONG time to put it off if you can do it now.
 

Joel_BC

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ninny said:
But what would I do with my raised beds when we moved? Anyway I could take them with me? :hu
I'll leave your main questions to others, 'cause I don't know what to tell you.

About the raised beds... You can move them, in a certain sense. You can move the soil. I've done that around our place here. It can take a lot of effort, time, and materials to build a good nutrient-rich, well-drained soil in a raised bed - so it's valuable stuff.

You can move the soil in a pickup truck, if it's worth it to you to make the trips. You could also load it into bins on a moving truck (etc).
 

~gd

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Joel_BC said:
ninny said:
But what would I do with my raised beds when we moved? Anyway I could take them with me? :hu
I'll leave your main questions to others, 'cause I don't know what to tell you.

About the raised beds... You can move them, in a certain sense. You can move the soil. I've done that around our place here. It can take a lot of effort, time, and materials to build a good nutrient-rich, well-drained soil in a raised bed - so it's valuable stuff.

You can move the soil in a pickup truck, if it's worth it to you to make the trips. You could also load it into bins on a moving truck (etc).
If you plan on doing this BE SURE YOU LIST THINGS TO BE MOVED on the document [sometimes called listing] offering the property for sale. I bought [made an accepted offer] on a place where they moved the fruit trees and vines. On the walk through before settlement [closing] I noticed the missing items so I tore the agent a new one. Once he calmed me down he told me that he had no part of the mess and was a victum too, he would lose the commission and his good name. He joined with me and went to the lawyer that was to do the closing and he contacted the listing agent. The listing agent didn't know either so he joined the gang that was waiting for the seller. We consulted and arrived at a figure for replacement cost. When the seller arrived he was told that he could settle for the agreed price minus the replacement costs or the sale would not go through. He refused so was stuck for all commisions fees and closing costs the closing lawyer represented every body but him. I have been told that different places have different laws and customs but the dirt makes the farm everywhere.
 

Joel_BC

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Ha-ha! :p Good point, ~gd. I was only answering about physical possiblities, not legalities and the expectations of the buyer. Your post fleshes-out the issue.
 

Beekissed

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Grow where you are planted! There are talkers and there are doers...the doers are doing things now instead of "some day" when they get the money, the right place, a different job, when they retire, when the kids are gone, when the kids are older, etc.

Make all your mistakes on the place you now live so that when you move you have all the kinks worked out of your methods and can move in with your work boots on and ready to git 'er done!
 

Denim Deb

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For as long as I can remember, I wanted a horse. If I had waited until I had the room, I'd still be waiting w/no idea as to when I'd get one. I'd say do what you can where you are, then take as much as you can w/you.
 

FarmerChick

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I would start my farm now. where you are. life might not go on for 6-7 years. seriously. you never know what might happen in that amt. of time let alone tomorrow :)

but also I wouldn't go hog wild only because HOW FAR are you going to move in the future? If you are looking local then animals are kinda easy to move, but if you are truly thinking long distance, best sell the animals before moving, get out to your new home and buy new ones.

don't wait. grab life by the horns and move forward
 

Marianne

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What she said. Do stuff now, continue to do stuff later.

If you have critters, then you have the makings of good compost and soil. I sure wouldn't mess with moving raised beds, you can always have more of them.

There will also be other critters to obtain. It might be better to try to sell some before you move, then you won't be too overwhelmed with stuff to do when you do move.
 

Corn Woman

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I agree do it now. Think of all the progress you can make in 5 years and if you own the property the value added is a great selling point.
 

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