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WW2 Rationing Recipes - Canadian and British

Discussion in 'The Homestead Kitchen - Recipes Etc' started by Marianne, Jul 13, 2019.

  1. Jul 13, 2019
    Marianne

    Marianne Super Self-Sufficient

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    Even though most of us have eaten it or still have it on the menu, I found this image on a Canadian site so plopped it here for a new thread.

    "Because meat was scarce, a product was invented that was found on almost every table during the war and beyond. Short for “Seasoned Ham,” Spam was a processed meat product that people ate in great quantities."

    http://www.elinorflorence.com/blog/rationing/

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Jul 13, 2019
    Marianne

    Marianne Super Self-Sufficient

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    "Weekly Rations Per One Adult:
    Sugar: one cup (the average Canadian today eats twice that much)
    Tea: two ounces, OR Coffee: eight ounces. (because these came from other countries)
    Butter: four ounces (one-quarter pound)
    Meat: 24-32 ounces (less than five ounces per day)
    Beer, spirits and wine were also rationed, but the amount varied between provinces.

    Children’s rations were smaller. Needless to say, there were very few leftovers! Besides, wasting food was considered absolutely unpatriotic."

    "Canadian culinary historian Mary F. Williamson of York University wrote an article about wartime rationing in which she quotes from one of her mother’s letters, dated September 1942:

    “We are asked not to use any pork or bacon for seven weeks while our commitments to Britain are being filled, there is no beef at all for sale (I think a lot is being sent to Russia), the sheep raisers are asked not to slaughter in order to raise more badly-needed wool, so a great many butchers have shut up shop.”

    http://www.elinorflorence.com/blog/rationing/
     
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  3. Jul 13, 2019
    Marianne

    Marianne Super Self-Sufficient

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    [​IMG]

    Apple and Rhubarb Crumble

    Filling:
    1 lb rhubarb
    1 lb tasty apples
    2 tablespoons of golden syrup or 2 oz sugar

    Topping:
    7 oz plain flour
    3 oz oats
    3 oz margarine or butter
    3 oz sugar for topping
    1 oz of light brown sugar to sprinkle on top
    pinch of salt

    Method:
    Wipe the rhubarb and cut into small pieces. Simmer in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon of water for about 10 minutes until cooked.
    Slice the apples into small pieces. Simmer in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon of water for about 5 minutes until cooked.
    Mix rhubarb and apple together when cooked and mix in the golden syrup or sugar.
    Grease a pie tin and spoon in the mixture.
    Place plain flour, pinch of salt, 3 oz sugar and 3 oz of butter or margarine (in small pieces) into a bowl together.
    Rub between fingers to create a breadcrumb like mixture and spoon over the top of the stewed fruit thickly.
    Sprinkle with the brown sugar.
    Place in an oven at around 170 C for 20 minutes until golden brown.

    Serves 6.
    Serve with custard.

    https://the1940sexperiment.com
     
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  4. Jul 13, 2019
    Marianne

    Marianne Super Self-Sufficient

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    Salad Dressing for Immediate Use

    "In one of my books there was a recipe for a quick salad dressing and luckily I had all the ingredients to hand. Well the taste was interesting…wasn’t exactly horrible but wasn’t exactly nice either. However, it did the trick."

    • Blend 1 level tablespoon of household milk powder with 1 level tablespoon of dried egg powder (just don’t sniff the dried egg or you’ll never use it again..), 1/2 teaspoon salt, a little pepper and dried mustard powder
    • Add 1 tablespoon of water and 2 tablespoons of vinegar and mix until smooth and beat well until thickens a little
    • Place in fridge until chilled and then use
    https://the1940sexperiment.com/2009/08/16/salad-dressing-for-immediate-use/
     
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  5. Jul 13, 2019
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    That was a cool article.

    There's only one way I like spam - but it's delish! We always had it cooked over an open fire on a camping or deer hunting trip. It's purely comfort food in my book. It's very simple - just fried onions, potatoes and spam. Thin slice it all and fry it up. My kids always think I'm over cooking it - but the best stuff is what sticks to the bottom of the pan. I only have it maybe once a year because we don't really eat potatoes...but I'm thinking hard about it right now. Wonder how it would be with sweet potatoes? Hmmmm….
     
  6. Jul 13, 2019
    Marianne

    Marianne Super Self-Sufficient

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    [​IMG]

    Glory Buns
    • 12 oz of wholewheat flour (or white)
    • 2 oz margarine
    • 2 oz sultanas/currants/raisins (optional)
    • 2 oz sugar
    • 8 fl oz warm water
    • 3 teaspoons of quick rise dried yeast
    • 1 teaspoon dried cinnamon powder
    • pinch salt
    To glaze:

    • 3 tablespoons water
    • 3 tablespoons sugar
    Method
    Place all the dried ingredients in a bowl (apart from dried fruit) and stir
    Rub in the margarine
    Mix in the dried fruit
    Add in the warm water
    Knead well (use extra flour if mixture is too sticky)
    Divide dough into 12 balls
    Place on greased deep sided tray (I like to use the 8 x 8 inch foil trays and place 4 balls in each)
    Cover with plastic film or plastic bag
    Leave to rise somewhere warm for an hour or so
    When risen place in oven at 180 C for 15 minutes or so until golden brown
    When cooked remove from oven onto a wire rack to cool
    When cool prepare glaze by heating the water and sugar together until dissolved
    Using a pastry brush apply the glaze generously

    https://the1940sexperiment.com/2009/11/12/glory-buns/
     
  7. Jul 13, 2019
    Marianne

    Marianne Super Self-Sufficient

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    I didn't want Spam for years. I just remembered that blop when it came out of the can and all the gel goop around it. My daughter had a friend that was Hawaiian and those folks eat a LOT of Spam. She shared a lot of recipes that our daughter tried. I knew one day it was going to be on the menu when we ate at her house. Spam Fried Rice.

    Ohr Mer Gerd!!

    The little Spam cubes were really crispy and it was really good! So we have that and just fried Spam slices occasionally. It's not gross when it comes out of the can now.

    Our friend's grandson brought back 6 cans of Spam from Hawaii when he was there visiting relatives. He didn't know they sold Spam in Nebraska.
     
  8. Jul 13, 2019
    Marianne

    Marianne Super Self-Sufficient

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    [​IMG]

    Vegetable and Oatmeal Goulash
    • 1 lb of mixed root vegetables ( I used 1 large potato, 2 parsnips, 2 large carrots)
    • knob of dripping (I used a vegan shortening)
    • 2 oz of coarse oatmeal (porridge oats will do)
    • 1 tsp of meat extract (I used Marmite)
    • 1 pt of vegetable stock
    • mixed herbs, salt and pepper
    Method
    1. Prepare and dice the vegetables
    2. Fry in dripping until slightly cooked
    3. Add oatmeal and keep stirring until fat is absorbed
    4. Cover with vegetable stock until covered and simmer until vegetables are soft and mixture is real thick (about 45 mins)
    5. Mix in meat extract when cooking
    6. Mix in herbs, salt and pepper to taste when cooking
    https://the1940sexperiment.com/2012/01/14/vegetable-and-oatmeal-goulash/
     
  9. Jul 13, 2019
    Marianne

    Marianne Super Self-Sufficient

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    [​IMG]

    Toad in a Hole. I thought that was an egg fried in a piece of bread with a hole cut out.

    Toad in the Hole
    • 1 oz of margarine/butter or dripping
    • 1 lb sausages
    • 5 oz plain flour
    • pinch salt
    • 1 tablespoon dried egg powder
    • 2 tablespoons water
    • 1/2 pint of milk or milk and water
    Method
    1. Pre-heat the oven to 200 C (400 F) or Gas Mark 6.
    2. Put the cooking fat into a Yorkshire pudding tin and place in oven for 5 minutes, add the sausages and toss in fat and cook for a further 5 minutes or so.
    3. Raise the temp to 220 C (425 F) or Gas Mark 7
    4. Blend the ingredients for the batter together (dry ingredients first and then slowly mix in the water/milk)
    5. Pour the batter over the piping hot sausages and bake for 30 minutes until well risen and golden brown
    6. Remove and serve
    https://the1940sexperiment.com/2013/08/11/toad-in-the-hole-recipe-no-114/
     
  10. Jul 13, 2019
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    That sure won't get you a job as a food reporter :lol:


    I am certain, given the limits of food available, that some truly strange combos came about. The butter & tea OR coffee would be the hard part for me in that list. The old farmers who had big gardens & extras canned, did ok -- all things considered.
     
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