Hello from the Canadian Maritimes!

Britesea

Sustainability Master
Joined
Jul 22, 2011
Messages
4,924
Reaction score
3,685
Points
333
Location
Klamath County, OR
I have 18 raised beds- 3' x 9', with 3' paths so I can get the garden cart through. Sometimes I've planted too much of one thing and not enough of another (never again will I plant an entire bed to kale!) but each year, things come into balance better. I'm hoping to flutter my eyelashes at DH and get him to make me some more raised beds, because I still don't have enough room to grow enough tomatoes and onions. We also have a small unheated greenhouse (8'x12') and I hope to get my act together this year to grow some cold hardy veggies in there (a la Four Season Garden). In the meantime, I start seeds indoors in March, move them into the greenhouse in April/May, and then into the garden in June. Most of the time this will garner me something to harvest, although our area has historically seen snow in all 12 months of the year, so fingers crossed.

Have you tried pressure canning yet? You can get a small pressure canner for quite reasonable, and it really expands what you can put on the shelves. We just went through a family-wide flu epidemic, and I was soooo happy to have cans of homemade pozole and chile verde and chicken soup, ready to open and heat up.
 

tortoise

Wild Hare
Joined
Nov 9, 2009
Messages
4,099
Reaction score
2,279
Points
357
Location
USDA Zone 3b/4a
I agree with the Lasagna Gardening book suggestion. I think square foot gardening is a waste of space.


The Market Gardener is my favorite gardening book ever. It discusses intensive planting. The garden is in Canada, but I think it's in a colder area than you are in? Internet says Nova Scotia is zone 5 - 7. I'm in Wisconsin, right between zones 3-4.

 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
3,266
Reaction score
3,242
Points
262
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
I agree with the Lasagna Gardening book suggestion. I think square foot gardening is a waste of space.

The Market Gardener is my favorite gardening book ever. It discusses intensive planting. The garden is in Canada, but I think it's in a colder area than you are in? Internet says Nova Scotia is zone 5 - 7. I'm in Wisconsin, right between zones 3-4.

Re: sq. foot gardening: One thing I've noticed: all of the pics show YOUNG plants. They don't ever show plants in full sprawl/mature mode. IMO, What can be gleaned from sq. foot gardening method: the concept of intensive planting and successive planting. I would not go through all of the theatrics of sq. foot gardening: placing individual seeds into carefully mapped out squares. But... I can agree with the concept... kind of... Except that plants require much more room than Sq. ft. gardening indicates.
 
Last edited:

WildBird

Power Conserver
Joined
Jan 3, 2020
Messages
27
Reaction score
18
Points
28
Location
Idaho
:welcome
Welcome! I want to get bees too, so maybe we can learn together! Good luck on your garden and have a great day!
 

YourRabbitGirl

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
431
Reaction score
171
Points
80
Thanks for the advice everyone. I will definitely look into some of these things.
Welcome to the forums!!! you're from Canada you say!!! I have family in Canada, they are into farming too... I miss them so much... have a great day!!!
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
3,266
Reaction score
3,242
Points
262
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
My thoughts when it comes to gardens. If you can't run with the big dogs, then stay on the porch. Otherwise go BIG or go home.
That opinion is valid if you have the space, land, and equipment. A large garden can produce tons of food. On the flip side, that would negate the bounty that can be grown on a postage stamp. Case in point: I have more salad greens growing on a single shelf, under 4' shop lights, in my office than hubby and I can keep up with. (4' x 18") will provide an impressive amount of food. I say, use what you have. And... even if it's just a couple large pots or window boxes on a back deck... something is better than nothing.

Sometimes, less is more. I'm keeping the same size fenced foot print in my garden. But cutting back on the sq. ft. of veggie plantings in favor of turning a good portion of it into chicken/duck coop with rotating paddocks/green manure planting. Will be making up for a bit of that loss by planting ornamental veggies in flower beds, HK, and sheet composting areas.

A large garden that is poorly managed, perhaps because the size is overwhelming to the gardener, will not produce as much as a smaller, well managed garden. The smaller garden may be easier to harvest and process at peak nutrient levels.
 

flowerbug

Almost Self-Reliant
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
1,064
Points
177
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
hello and welcome from mid-Michigan. :)

with smaller spaces it can be harder to manage some plants that like to vine (tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, etc.) so it is important to find the varieties work within your space.
 

Latest posts

Top