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Natural animal care

Discussion in 'Natural Remedies' started by Beekissed, May 6, 2017.

  1. May 7, 2017
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    Nearly every gizzard I've cut open and emptied on my chickens over the years contain what I always call saw grass....a tough, fibrous type grass that has very sharp edges to it...it will slice your finger much like a paper cut. The edges are also jagged, serrated in nature.

    I've noticed dogs and cats seeking out this grass and chewing on it also and have read about wild canines doing the same. From what I've read, they chew this grass to rid themselves of intestinal parasites. I can only conclude the chickens consume it for the same reason, as there are many, many more tender and nutritious grasses and legumes in their range for eating.

    Free range flocks that have access to a wide variety of range feed, grasses, leaves, etc. must do very well at ridding themselves of parasites, as I've never found any worms in of them over these many years~with one exception, a chicken that I got back from a place where they had been confined inside for over a year and was culled shortly after arriving here. That one had a load of tapeworms.
     
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  2. May 8, 2017
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Almost Self-Reliant

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    If an animal has been raised to forage, they will seek and eat the plants/dirts that have what they need. Remember the wild herds have done this for years.

    Often our domestication reduces their ability to eat this way, as you mention. It may be confinement BUT often it is humans who feel a need to "kill the weeds". I watched my goats happily eat every dandelion flower they found yesterday, along with plantain, rape, vetch, Australian peas, etc.-- growing in their pastures.
     
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  3. Oct 17, 2017
    ChickenMomma91

    ChickenMomma91 Almost Self-Reliant

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    How would you guys treat chicken mites? They've migrated to my legs which are now raw from itching. I've even been to the doctor who gave me ivermectin pills and it helped but it didn't get rid of it entirely. I provide the girls with a dust bath that has DE sprinkled in there on occasion but its been so wet here lately that nothing is dry.
    Also my dog has fleas so bad shes getting bald patches from chewing/itching and I'm constantly having to stop her from chewing on herself. we've tried the chemical treatment and its not working.
     
  4. Oct 18, 2017
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    I can't help much with curative treatments, as my approach is always geared towards prevention. Never had that type of mites on my chickens, so not sure what others are using.

    It sounds like the type of mite that infests the wood in the coop...do you know what color they are?

    Fleas....I'd treat your yard with garden lime when you are getting a few good dry days coming up. Then I'd do the same to your dog, then start regularly adding apple cider vinegar in his water. I'd repeat the lime in a couple of weeks for good measure.

    Then, each spring and fall I'd do a lime treatment. I've gotten away from the chemical flea treatments, as I feel they possibly just breed a more resistant flea.

    So far it's working for my dogs(and cats) and I'm loving it!
     
  5. Oct 19, 2017
    baymule

    baymule Super Self-Sufficient

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    I would try Aloe Vera gel with Lidocaine, you can find it in the sun burn products. it is also great for practically any type bug bites. That will stop the itch. As for the mites....I haven't had mites on my chickens, but I read on BYC that people use vasoline on their chickens legs and it smothers the mites. Maybe for you, a jar of Vaseline and a pair of leggings?
     
  6. Oct 19, 2017
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    Argh- makes me itch just thinking about it. Hope you get resolved quickly!
     
  7. Oct 19, 2017
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    Bay, those are scale mites and they don't leave a chicken and bite humans, just live under the scales of the birds. I think she's got a type of bird mite that sucks the blood of the bird on their bodies, just not sure what kind...would need to know the color of them.

    For a low level mite treatment you could use garden lime or sulfur dust on the chickens, in their roosts and nest bedding. I'd clean out the coop and dust that as well, as well as their run.

    If that doesn't work, permethrin is a more powerful choice.
     
  8. Oct 19, 2017
    Hinotori

    Hinotori Super Self-Sufficient

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    This is not a natural cure.

    A last resort is to use Dog Frontline. 2 drops for bantam. 3 for large fowl.

    I had to ask around a few years ago when some wild birds brought in an infestation of northern fowl mite that got heavy fast. I tried all the other fixes and almost lost my friendly ameraucana rooster to them. Everyone got treated. No more mites the next day. Interestingly, the silkies had less issues with the mites.

    I've screened out the birds fairly well now, except for the newer net on the silkie pen. Seems redwing blackbirds and starlings can fly through draped 2 inch netting. Ordering a new 1 inch one.
     
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