Official SS Poll: What do you do to eliminate bills / cut down expenses?

What do you do to eliminate bills / cut down expenses?

  • Make your own ______ (e.g. bread, laundry detergent, shampoo, etc.)

    Votes: 43 68.3%
  • Maintain a vegetable / fruit garden

    Votes: 53 84.1%
  • Raise my own livestock

    Votes: 42 66.7%
  • Use discount coupons

    Votes: 21 33.3%
  • Recycle / Repurpose

    Votes: 53 84.1%
  • Buy at Thrift shops

    Votes: 45 71.4%
  • Can / Preserve / Freeze your own

    Votes: 52 82.5%
  • Cook at home and avoid eating at restaurants

    Votes: 55 87.3%
  • Others: (Please specify)

    Votes: 17 27.0%

  • Total voters
    63

baymule

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Bay, you may be waiting for medicare to do those knees. I've had mine 7 yrs and never used it. No need. In fact, I'm thinking it should be set up like car insurance, you know -- reduce the deductible for each year no have no claims??? YES!!:old That would be very good.

I won't be rushing into knee surgery. I am hard headed and if I can put it off, I will. I am otherwise healthy, take no prescriptions.
 

Mini Horses

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Just ready on BYH and can say that the thought process, for retirement income/spending, begins to change your patterns some. When young and working full time, you see, buy, pay and depend on the "loaners" to tell you "you are over spent". You feel your promotions & pay raises are just in the near future & normally they are. Most of the time things go ok.

Let's face it -- most people do NOT plan well for the future. In years past it was not as thought out for anyone and long term care rarely considered. Expenses & income have changed dramatically over the last 30 years! What a smart planner has in a current "plan" for these things is often more than what a person of MY generation even earned, way back then.

When you get to retirement age you are rarely on the "short list" for hires! :rolleyes: Your income often becomes limited and set. Promotions & raises are normally not gonna happen. Dismal? Not all together so -- but you do begin to work "around" your limitations -- free, barter & discount is huge. That is why gardening (which we love anyway) & preserving the harvest become far more important! The milking becomes self-sustaining, not just a chore, and so on.

You begin to look at the sale of 5 dozen eggs as enough to buy the hens feed to supplement free range. Selling kids or calves becomes -- how many months of hay they buy -- it works to help you keep your life in order. Right now, I must raise more winter feed!!

I didn't plan to have 5 broody hens at once....with over 50 eggs!....but, I do. They will give me replacement layers, freezer roos, can cull older hens for dog/cat food, maybe some pullet sales AND these chicks are "FREE" as a product of my flock. (I don't have to pay $2.99 per @TSC) It's a thought process, a mindset that we need to develop. Farming is a job. You will find that retirement is, also.:old If we can break it down into manageable units the finances are less of a burden. We set a little aside for "dream" purchases and thrill to smaller goals being achieved. My cream separator was huge for me. 20 yrs ago, a minor buy.

Most on this forum are working toward more self-reliance. Age does create another stage in life. MANY of us are there :lol:


Great example -- if you like okra, easy to grow & big producer. In stores it's almost $5 a pound! I don't eat it -- but --- what a saving to grow some if you like it. Butternut squash is $1 a pound. I had about 140# from 3 volunteer plants last yr. Still have some to eat -- it stores great!! Goat cheese is $1-$3 a pound. I make it from excess milk! We all need to look at what is already part of our life that create saving each day, week, year.

Bay may be the queen of "hog butcher" :p She feeds the neighborhood and they help her in return!!! KUDOS. Everyone needs to continue to share how it works for them -- we can continue to live well.
 
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baymule

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@Mini Horses....well put. yes, we have to rearrange things, I manage to pay for most of the hens feed by selling eggs. I am raising CX now to see if selling slaughtered chickens is feasible. I have one customer lined up, we'll see how it goes. if not, I'll stock our freezer and have plenty for DD and her family.

Raising 2 hogs now, 1 is sold and half of the other one is sold. I actually make money on the pigs. I sell lambs, but the sheep are a money losing operation.

Raising a garden is a pleasure for good food and exercise. I like the way I can use animal manure to help the soil, I feed garden trimmings and excess to the animals. I even pull the weeds and toss to the animals. I can, freeze and dehydrate produce from the garden. We eat good.

We work hard here, but it is on out timeline. If we are tired and sleep late, it's ok. If we want to take a day off, we do. We love our life and are having the time of our lives.
 

Mini Horses

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In the sense that the sheep are "there" to care for all year and lambs are the "for sale" & "to butcher" feature, they can be slightly negative $$. But, the joy of watching them, handling them (when tame) has it's pleasure -- a needed pleasure, I might add. :)

My goats are milked for use...sheep can be. So my goats are a challenge to justify some years -- since VA limits the milk sales (can be worked around :cool:) -- but, cheese can be sold as the process does actually pasteurize it. You must have tasted the milk from Devon. It is truly excellent milk -- I love mine!!! Now, I'm not being an enabler :hide but your DGs would love this fresh milk! :drool This year hard cheese & cream.

I visited a "backyard farmer" yesterday to select a new buck and it was so calming to interact with her herd of goats. The Saanen breed is known for pleasant personality, plus large quantity of great milk. I love mine and now own a fullblood buckling. :cool: Can't wait for next breeding season & Spring kids! Also had ideas from seeing her operation. My main barn will get a revamp this summer -- for a re-designed goat barn & milk parlor. :loveThey still have a large loafing barn in another field.

BONUS -- she is a wildlife rehab person, so lot of info. Turkeys there __ eggs & poults for sale. But, talking & walking we came upon a huge overgrown patch of thornless blackberry (were there at house purchase) and some raspberries. She stated they were going to dig & dump to get under control :idunno Of course I volunteered to take some and she said "all you want!!!" & I also have some wormwood, lemon mint, catnip and some other stuff you can get. Shovel is in my truck. The buckling & free plants coming back Sunday. What a savings + things I wanted. :celebrate :clap :celebrate

A TRUE retirement savings & sufficiency trip. :caf
 

baymule

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I can only like this one time, but just know that I hit the like around 10 times!
 

baymule

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A neighbor stopped a couple weeks ago asking if he could put a pig in with ours. I told him no and explained that my two were boars and would torment his little female to death. Upon questioning, he had a pen he could put the pig in, so I strongly encouraged him to add onto it and strengthen it, which he did. I told him that we would help him slaughter it and loan him our meat grinder to make sausage and teach them how. I also told him that we would show them how to cure the bacon, smoke it and get the "neighborhood" meat slicer to slice and package it up. Him and his wife are both disabled, so money is tight. They are so excited over having this pig, it will help them a lot to fill their freezer.

Sometimes, it ain't what you do for yourself, it's all about what you do for others.
 

FarmerJamie

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This renting is driving me nuts. The best I can do right now is to look for bargains/sales at the meat shop, stock up, and freeze. 18 more months of alimony......:barnie
 

Mini Horses

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Sometimes, it ain't what you do for yourself, it's all about what you do for others.

We are ALL in this together. Every day that I wake up I thank God for good health & the things that I have!

There are families &/or elders who TRULY need the help. When I find them, some of my excess eggs go to them "so they aren't wasted as I have too many". Sometimes cheeses & milk, xtra veggies, etc. Used to take wood to an elder on my street. She heated with wood (all she had for heat. Pot bellied stove) & at 86 had issues! It is how we who are able can help those with such little things that they can use & enjoy. I often have excess from food demos. I share. We all need to seek & assist in a very low key manner. Often they are too embarrassed to ask or say their need is real. Just say it's "left over, excess, etc".

I would GUESS Bay, that when the time comes you will do a lot of "let me show you" and "this is leftover spices maybe you can use". We never know when we may need such kindness.

Farmer Jamie...bide your time. It will end soon. :hugs

Just a note -- I was working next to a Lowes today & on break wandered over to check out plants. Their blackberry & raspberry shoots were $10.98 EACH. I am certain that I will bring home $200 worth!!:lol: this buckling is a "steal". :clap
 

frustratedearthmother

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I was working next to a Lowes today & on break wandered over to check out plants. Their blackberry & raspberry shoots were $10.98 EACH.
That's UGH! But, like you said - getting those free canes will more than cover the cost of that buckling! Great!
 
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