Wedding Reception (Beer / Cider / Wine)

CrealCritter

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Ok I decided I'm going to make up 15 different labels. They will all be the same background but each lable will say Do Not Open until Day Month and Year and each label will have a different wisdom verse about marriage in the forground.

Maybe you can help me with the verses. These are the 15 I have so far.

Years

1) Genesis 2:24: "Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and they shall become one flesh."

2) Ecclesiastes 4:9: "Two are better than one, because they have a good return for their labor: If either of them falls down, one can help the other up.

3) Ephesians 5:25: "For husbands, this means love your wives, just as Christ loved the church. He gave up his life for her."

4) Colossians 3:14: "And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity."

5) Mark 10:9: "Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate."

6) Romans 13:8: "Owe no one anything, except to love each other, for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law."

7) 1 Corinthians 13:4-5: "Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs."

8) 1 Corinthians 16:14: "Do everything in love."

9) Song of Solomon 8:7: "Many waters cannot quench love; rivers cannot wash it away. If one were to give all the wealth of his house for love, it would be utterly scorned."

10) Proverbs 3:3-4: "Let love and faithfulness never leave you; bind them around your neck, write them on the tablet of your heart. Then you will win favor and a good name in the sight of God and man."

11) 1 John 4:16: "And so we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them."

12) 1 Peter 4:8: "Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins."

13) 1 Corinthians 13:13: "And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love."

14) Proverbs 30:18-19: "There are three things that amaze me—no, four things that I don't understand: how an eagle glides through the sky, how a snake slithers on a rock, how a ship navigates the ocean, how a man loves a woman."

15) Romans 12:10: "Be devoted to one another in love. Honor one another above yourselves."

Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
 

Messybun

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I really like the idea of the fifteen years of wines. That’s just awesome. With the verses I think starting with Genesis is really clever, and for the proceeding years just pray about what order.
 

CrealCritter

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6 1/2 gallons Irish Red Ale on left and 6 gallons of Blond Ale on the right. I racked both into clear 6 1/2 gallon glass carboys and 1/2 gallon growler for secondary fermentation. They will stay in the carboys/growler covered with some old tee-shirts, until they drop clear naturally. Clarification for ales usually takes 2 to 3 weeks.

If all goes according to plan, I should end up with deep Ruby red colored Irish Red Ale and a Straw colored Blond Ale. So far so good but hoping for successful finished beer.
IMG_20210528_192100335.jpg


Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
 
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CrealCritter

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Apple cider wine creation is kegged and on CO2 gas. I'm working on corking bottles. I went with brown Bordeaux 750ml bottles and synthetic #9 corks for longevity :)

I guess the plus is the corker' gets a glass to drink and afterward he'll be ready for bed : 😂
IMG_20210528_230000918.jpg


Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
 
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Messybun

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6 1/2 gallons Irish Red Ale on left and 6 gallons of Blond Ale on the right. I racked both into clear 6 1/2 gallon glass carboys and 1/2 gallon growler for secondary fermentation. They will stay in the carboys/growler covered with some old tee-shirts, until they drop clear naturally. Clarification for ales usually takes 2 to 3 weeks.

If all goes according to plan, I should end up with deep Ruby red colored Irish Red Ale and a Straw colored Blond Ale. So far so good but hoping for successful finished beer.
View attachment 15932

Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
Why do you cover the jugs with t-shirts? Just curiosity.
 

CrealCritter

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Why do you cover the jugs with t-shirts? Just curiosity.
The old tee-shirts are to keep the sun or artificial light out, which creates "light struck" skunky smelling beer. Wine and cider are also the same. This is why most all beer/wine/cider comes in cans, dark colored glass or stainless steel kegs.

I secondary in clear glass so I can see the clearing occur and know when it'll time rack the cleared beer into a 5 gallon stainless steel keg and or bottles. I really need the visual inspection which is easy when in clear glass carboys. What you see in the picture is suspended yeast which makes the beer cloudy. Once the yeast eats all the available sugars from the malt, it will slowly drop out of suspension and settle on the bottom of the carboy. This clearing always happens from the top down. I'll get a picture so I can show you a visual reference.

Since all my beers are home made, they all behave a little differently. Also my beers are unfiltered, with the yeast kept alive and naturally carbonated. So they need to stay in the dark as much as possible. This is unlike most all of the killed yeast, artificially preservatives added, filtered and force carbonated commercial store bought brews.

Sorry for the long winded answer. But your question was not a simple one since it is just one aspect of a multi point process that has great dependencies for successful outcome.

Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
 
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Messybun

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The old tee-shirts are to keep the sun or artificial light out, which creates "light struck" skunky smelling beer. Wine and cider are also the same. This is why most all beer/wine/cider comes in cans, dark colored glass or stainless steel kegs.

I secondary in clear glass so I can see the clearing occur and know when it'll time rack the cleared beer into a 5 gallon stainless steel keg and or bottles. I really need the visual inspection which is easy when in clear glass carboys. What you see in the picture is suspended yeast which makes the beer cloudy. Once the yeast eats all the available sugars from the malt, it will slowly drop out of suspension and settle on the bottom of the carboy. This clearing always happens from the top down. I'll get a picture so I can show you a visual reference.

Since all my beers are home made, they all behave a little differently. Also my beers are unfiltered, with the yeast kept alive and naturally carbonated. So they need to stay in the dark as much as possible. This is unlike most all of the killed yeast, artificially preservatives added, filtered and force carbonated commercial store bought brews.

Sorry for the long winded answer. But your question was not a simple one since it is just one aspect of a multi point process that has great dependencies for successful outcome.

Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
I appreciate the answer! Only time I made alcohol was for school biology, and it was to study how yeast behaves. Not that that can really count as making a beverage lol. Keeping it dark completely makes sense now, energy (in the form of light) will do some strange things to micro organisms.
 

farmerjan

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I liked that you explained it. I am not a beer drinker, or wine, or 99% of the alcohols available. I don't like most of the stuff I have tasted over the years. I will drink some Kahlua, Amaretto, and a good rum in a pina colada... but I like it real real weak. I am just not into beer or wine at all. Have some friends here that have a Vineyard and he makes very good wine if the awards he has gotten are an indication. His wife has had me taste nearly every kind they have over the years..... nope, just don't like it. But I find your pictures and your descriptions fascinating. Thanks.
 

CrealCritter

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Nice coloring in the Irish Red Ale, so far👌
IMG_20210531_002623257~2.jpg


I've made this self created Irish Red Ale recipe several times. It took me a couple of tries to get the right mix of grains to get the red color, then it was a tweak on flavor and technique. I don't care much for dark roasted barley, so I used light roasted barley instead and just enough that you know, it's there but it's not front and center.

I personally believe there are two outside of the box techniques, I personally developed for this brew, is what i believe makes this beer stand out.

1) I use low oxygen techniques during mashing. By adding the water to the bottom of the mash tub and placing a stainless steel mash cap over top of the grains. This keeps oxygen exposure of the grains to a minimum. Mashing is just when you steep the crushed grains at a certain water temperature to allow the enzymes already present in the malts, to convert starches to sugars (boy did I broad bush that definition). And since it is totally illegal to own a still in Illinois. I also add Potassium Metabisulfite to my brew water which drives out oxygen from the water and eliminates both free chlorine and chloramine from the water. Else I would just distill my own water and it would probably be an even better beer. It's as close as I can get to distilled water without actually distilling my own water. Which again is totally illegal in illinois.

As far as the other technique, I do a slow rolling boil for entire hour for this brew and it's mainly the reason I end up with 1/2 gallon extra because their's less boil down than a "normal brew calls for". There is absolutely no need to carmelize any of the sugars in this beer, it should be a fairly dry in the mouth when drank.

It's a really good beer and very authentic. It's the result of a lot of research and trial and error and inventing some new to me techniques. If you're looking for a authentic Irish Red Ale. The recipe is near the beginning of the thread. And I could help guide you, if you want to give it a go.

BTW I brew beer / cider / wine / mead because I like the flavors and the health benefits of natural fermented foods and drinks. I also make saurkraut, fermented pickles and ginger ale too. I guess i just like fermentation.

Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
 
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