What did you do in your garden today?

tortoise

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Weather is nice so I started on the raised bed area. Every year I try to give them a little lift. This year they need a BIG lift, lol. I'm planning on adding some barn gold (dirt from the barn, lol), some old hay and some cardboard. This area grows the BEST weeds in the world and it's a constant battle to not have them take over. I'd love to NOT have to fight weeds all season.

I know I'm overthinking this - but in what order would you layer the materials (the cardboard, barn dirt and old hay)?

Would you lay the cardboard down on the existing bed and then and then add the dirt and top it with hay? Or would you add the dirt,, the hay and then the cardboard on top, or the hay, then the dirt and then the cardboard or.... ?
cardboard first, as thick as you can. I would put hay in the middle. It's hard to hoe areas that have hay on top.
 

frustratedearthmother

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LOL - told ya'll I was overthinking it.

Because I'm just adding a couple inches of new soil to the soil that has compacted down in the beds I thought I should put the soil down first then top it with some pretty well rotted hay and then top it all with the cardboard. My plan was to just cut holes in the cardboard to plant through when the time comes.
 

flowerbug

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LOL - told ya'll I was overthinking it.

Because I'm just adding a couple inches of new soil to the soil that has compacted down in the beds I thought I should put the soil down first then top it with some pretty well rotted hay and then top it all with the cardboard. My plan was to just cut holes in the cardboard to plant through when the time comes.

the deeper things are over the cardboard the better as that means there is less light and air getting down there and through the cracks to attract the weeds and give them an easier escape route. :) some may still get through but you can get them out pretty easy if you chop them off down as deep as you can before they get going again too much. you want to exhaust whatever energy those roots might have left.
 

Mini Horses

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I started sorting seeds and putting planting dates into my calendar.

I did get some onion and carrots seeds in before the snow yesterday. First time sowing seeds in the winter so I am interested to see how this works.
I have a chart that lists time to start inside, sow direct, expect harvest of many veggies -- for my area. It helps me to make my own schedule....if I use it :hide also a companion planter...which helps with not putting things together as with together. Then I chart the garden and plan, in pencil! One of the university sites had a few charts I printed to show normal yields, storage time, etc. They've been helpful.

Mother nature holds seed and start the growth when she says ready. Worked for eons. Plus certain seed need the temps and some moisture to grow. I've put beets in frig with damp paper towel, in a bag, before planting. Better germination. I'm thinking your winter planting may be good. We await a report. ;)

Because I had no 2021 garden, I'm super anxious for coming season! I have a lot of seed, some old but, so much that only some needs to be viable. Need to use or clear out, so I will plant and hope. If no sprouts, buy then. Pretty sure I'm covered! Most seed is good for several years if stored well. Trust me, I think I have every type I'd ever want. Also a problem -- planting too much, or what you eat but, eat little of. Control myself.

Also have seed for raising things for chicken/animal feeds...Milo, hulled oats, flax, buckwheat, sorghum. Last one was a surprise! Especially after the thread on sorghum syrup on here recently. Plus, those mangal beets are going to be planted this year.

And I had bought a lot of the rainbow corns to plant for selling in fall, along with a gazillion pumpkins! :lol: didn't get corn & pumpkins out this yr....will for 2022! If I EVER think I will retire, something needs to make money beyond my goats and eggs. :old

I'm at a point of wondering WHY I have all this farm if I don't use it just a little more. 🤔Satisfaction would be just paying for more animal feeds, tractor fuel, equipment...cover the costs of my chosen hobby endeavors. Yeah, this is my telling year. 2020 was planned, then c-19 closed up everything. I'm buckling down now. Otherwise, I only need 3 goats, 6 chickens and 5 acres! 😁 :lol: :idunno o_O and I don't want to move!
 

flowerbug

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i've found out that i really like flax seed, eating it whole and crunchy and then chewing it up. :) the flax plant itself is also a useful source of fiber for making things, but i've not done anything with it myself. the blue flowers are always so welcome. i have to remember to plant some this year to renew my seed supply.
 

R2elk

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i've found out that i really like flax seed, eating it whole and crunchy and then chewing it up. :) the flax plant itself is also a useful source of fiber for making things, but i've not done anything with it myself. the blue flowers are always so welcome. i have to remember to plant some this year to renew my seed supply.
I started Blue Flax perennial years ago. They keep multiplying and spreading as long as they get a little water. I planted some Scarlet Flax this year. I await next year to see if it returns. It too is listed as a perennial.
 

flowerbug

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I started Blue Flax perennial years ago. They keep multiplying and spreading as long as they get a little water. I planted some Scarlet Flax this year. I await next year to see if it returns. It too is listed as a perennial.

is the blue a black seeded variety? i have both a golden seed and a black seed, the black seed is a perennial and the golden seed is an annual. actually, i'm not sure i have any more black seeded ones around, but i hope i can find some eventually again. the golden flax i have plenty of seeds and so i should be ok with those.

we used to have a ton of the black seeded kind around and they were great, but they were not really a true perennial because they'd die off after a few years so they were not very easy to take care of and would get weeds growing in them. i think it would have been better to treat them as an annual and if i can find some of them growing and can get some seeds next year i'll do that for the future.

the scarlet flowered one i'll be interested in hearing how it does. :)
 
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