Back to Eden Gardening Thread~Note: pic heavy thread.

Beekissed

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Some of the coop clean out, some just loose hay, some pine needles and leaves....hoping that will suppress some weedlings until I can get the new chips hauled to cover the garden.

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Had to tie up more peas ...their weight was pulling them away from the fence. We'll be picking sugar snap peas any day now and a good plenty of them. Most of these peas are as tall as me now and some are taller.

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Beekissed

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I hope to work on my tunnel on Friday to make it easier to access and harvest what's inside. Will also work on my propane weed burner to retrofit it for a hole maker in the landscaping fabric in which to plant. Just makes for a nice, neatly round hole where you need it.

When I get that done I'll plant the rest of this tunnel and the other one. By August I'd like to have another couple of tunnels up and ready for planting my winter harvest romaine, pak choy, carrots, broccoli,peas and spinach. This will be my first attempt at a four seasons garden. I'm going to plant some kale between the tunnels for winter as well.
 

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No, I've never done that....but I'm guessing one could sprout them much like bean sprouts and eat them that way. That would be a tasty salad addition!
 

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I had them at a restaurant a year or so ago. Totally not impressed. The texture was like wet hay. Um... I'm guessing that fresh picked, super young from my garden might be a different experience. My chickens certainly like to pluck any they can reach through the deer netting.
 

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I've never picked them and brought them in to do something with them, but the tender ends of the vines are a fantastic nibble in the garden. Very sweet.
 

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Planted a flat of annuals, landscaped around the peonies and a rose bush, hauled composted chicken litter for those beds and then covered with wood chips.

Planted three perennial herbs in the garden and also some wild daisies I picked out by the mailbox. Watered tomato and lettuce seedlings and all the freshly planted flowers.

Walked around with a huge smile in my heart at all the beautiful growth this year!
 

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Dusted the spuds with sweet lime to get rid of the pesky flea beetles. Not too bad this year but I still want them to stop putting holes in my tater's leaves. The potatoes are just lovely this year!

Also dusted the beans and cukes for anything wanting to take a bite of those. Had seen a few little nibbles from some unknown bug. Why doesn't anything eat the sugar snap peas, I wonder? They look beautifully succulent to me but not a bug bite on a one!
 

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Coming on some really dry weather and my chips are thin, so must haul chips this week to keep what little moisture I have in the garden soil. Sort of like when your hair is doing really well and suddenly it's outgrown its cut, these chips just seemed to disappear all the sudden and the same thing happened in Joel's BTE and his is only 2 yrs old this spring.

For this part of the BTE, I wish I had equipment for maintaining it....like a cub tractor with a bucket attachment. That would be soooooooo convenient for moving chips into the garden. Nope...have to do it the old fashioned way, a forkful at a time.
 
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