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frustratedearthmother

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Don't think badly of me, but I am not bringing her in the house to try to warm her up. I can't breed chickens that can't handle our weather.
Doesn't do any good to breed something that's not suited for its environment. Always sad to lose one - but I agree with your decision.
 

NH Homesteader

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Thanks. I feel like a bad chicken keeper but I also am not comfortable handling them while I'm pregnant. Goats, fine. Poultry... Not so much. Too many poultry health issues that I don't know how they affect humans.

Tree is down, boxes all folded up to be recycled. Now to eat lunch and find homes for new toys.
 

sumi

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With your weather, it's going to have to be survival of the fittest, or you're going to end up with a house full of chickens and you have enough on your plate. Hope she will toughen up and be o.k.
 

NH Homesteader

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Thanks, but she's gone already. She was a friendly chicken too. Well try Dorkings one more time, next year, from a breeder. Preferably a northern breeder. I am happy with the other breeds, assuming the Cornish continue to do well. Brewster the Dom and the original hen have survived (happily) 4 winters of this weather so I don't think it's our fault.
 

treerooted

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My Dorking hen is doing the hide in the corner, don't eat don't drink thing. I gave them super warm water, plenty of grain and no one else is acting poorly. I think the hatchery Dorkings are not up for NH winters. Don't think badly of me, but I am not bringing her in the house to try to warm her up. I can't breed chickens that can't handle our weather. I put the water dish and some grain where she can reach it, she's in a sunny spot and let's hope she can snap out of it. Otherwise we'll just be breeding Dominiques and Cornishes, all of whom currently look perfectly content (and feisty, for the Cornish roo!) despite the cold.

Mmm, that's interesting and good to know. I wasn't planning on getting Dorkings for 2018, but there are on my list for 2019. It's crazy cold now and I'd say my Brahmas are the least effected by it, though everyone seems to be doing fine. They're all big chicken breeds.
 

NH Homesteader

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We've never had issues with birds in the cold so this is a first for us. But since the roo died our first cold snap and she just flopped over during our 2nd one, I would say don't buy them from Murray McMurray if you live up north! My husband doesn't know yet, he's going to be bummed. They were a big part of his breeding plan.at least his Cornishes are doing well. We've pretty much named the roo Gengis Khan. @tortoise won't be surprised lol!!

Thanks FEM, I'll bookmark that for when we're ready to order some. Not this year I don't think.
 

Devonviolet

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Have you ever considered raising ducks? We have three breeds (Pekins, Muscovy & Khaki Campbell), plus 2 geese.

Recently, ome of our Pekins was beaten up by one (or more) of the other birds). There was a 1/2" wound near her lower left beak. I caught her, cleaned her up and checked for other injuries, which there didn't appear to be any.

While I was checking her, we were amazed at how thick her feathers were. With the natural oil on their feathers, its no wonder they don't think twice about going in the water when its cold out. They are known to tolerate -15° weather. They do need more feed when its cold out due to a high metabolism. They also tolerate TX's hot summers, as well.
 

NH Homesteader

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We had ducks for years. Turns out my husband is allergic to the eggs. He had mild symptoms when I baked with them but one night I was out of chicken eggs and made him a duck egg omelet and he got really sick. I do want a few ducks again, but mostly as pets because I adore them! DH is into chickens and turkeys, and doesn't care as much about ducks. They would swim when it was - 20 out. It was always amusing!
 

goatgurl

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so glad you are still all in one piece and that little person in there is patiently waiting to get out. not much longer. I hate that your dark Cornish roo is such a chicken butt. I've had mine for the past 3 or so years and he is really a gentleman. if he was as mean as yours he would be dumplings by now. you really need a few ducks just for fun. I really love my muscovys they are so darn tame. I have some that I've taught to catch food that I throw at them with their beaks. they are so proud of themselves when they do. about once a year my pond will get a light ice on it and the poor things get so confused and want to know why they can't swim. skating is not of their favorite pass times. you take care of yourself and try, just try to take it easy till dd2 gets here.
 

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