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The Bread Thread!

Discussion in 'The Homestead Kitchen - Recipes Etc' started by Beekissed, Dec 6, 2011.

  1. Oct 10, 2018
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    Sure can...this recipe makes for a large batch of bread, so you'll have to split it if you want to make less, of course.

    4 c. warm water
    3 T. yeast
    1/2 c. to 1 c. of honey (your preference)
    2 c. whole wheat flour

    Combine and let sponge form.

    1/3 c of ground flax seed
    1/3 c. ground sunflower seed
    1/2 c to 1 c. of Quaker oats
    1 T. salt
    1/2 c. oil (your preference...right now I'm using coconut oil)

    Mix into sponge and start adding whole wheat and/or white flour one cup at a time until the consistency is right for kneading. Knead bread, adding handfuls of flour, until the consistency is firm, springy and ready to form into your dough ball. Form your ball and coat lightly with oil, cover and let rise, punching it down each time, for 3-4 proofs before forming into rolls or loaves and baking at 350* for 30 min. or lightly brown.
     
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  2. Oct 11, 2018 at 1:51 AM
    baymule

    baymule Sustainability Master

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    @Beekissed how long does it take for sponge to form?
     
  3. Oct 11, 2018 at 1:36 PM
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    That depends on the ambient temps, the warmth of the water used, the quality of your yeast, etc. Usually I'll have a good sponge going in 15-20 min but on hot days, even faster.
     
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  4. Oct 11, 2018 at 2:53 PM
    wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Almost Self-Reliant

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    Thanks, @Beekissed !
    That bread sounds wonderful! and I have all the ingredients in my pantry. Making bread this weekend ...
     
  5. Oct 14, 2018 at 6:58 PM
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    An interesting thing I found out-- In the old days the bread wasn't mixed in a bowl. You just poured the liquids etc. into a "well" in your bag or barrel of flour and mixed it until it didn't grab any more flour. At that point it was perfect for kneading. The clever thing about it is that you don't have to worry about adjusting for humidity and so forth!
     
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  6. Oct 15, 2018 at 9:29 AM
    sumi

    sumi Sustainability Master Administrator

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    O.K. that is interesting!
     
  7. Oct 15, 2018 at 3:24 PM
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    I'd read about that method in the old West times, when old "sourdoughs" would use that method to form their sourdough biscuits each morning.
     

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