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Alaskan

Lovin' The Homestead
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We had 4 days of sun.... and now are back to rain.
 

Britesea

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Fires still going strong around us, and now we have domestic wells going dry left and right. Meanwhile, Klamath Lake is filled to the tippytop and the Feds will not allow us to take any out; we need to save the suckerfish and the salmon. Nevermind that the lake is at a historic high, and the suckerfish etc didn't die off when it was at historic lows. Matter of fact, there's some scientists that think that our chronic problems with bluegreen algae bloom is exactly because the lake is unnaturally full. If they're right, that will probably kill the suckerfish et al.
Our well pressure is dropping. We are down to 40pounds; I don't know if that means our well is going dry too. Of course, this had to happen the first year I increased the size of the garden so we could grow all our own food.
 

Alaskan

Lovin' The Homestead
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Fires still going strong around us, and now we have domestic wells going dry left and right. Meanwhile, Klamath Lake is filled to the tippytop and the Feds will not allow us to take any out; we need to save the suckerfish and the salmon. Nevermind that the lake is at a historic high, and the suckerfish etc didn't die off when it was at historic lows. Matter of fact, there's some scientists that think that our chronic problems with bluegreen algae bloom is exactly because the lake is unnaturally full. If they're right, that will probably kill the suckerfish et al.
Our well pressure is dropping. We are down to 40pounds; I don't know if that means our well is going dry too. Of course, this had to happen the first year I increased the size of the garden so we could grow all our own food.
Wow!

Very stressful.

Odd though... that the overful lake doesn't result in full wells.

My well is from rain and ground water that percolates downwards.
 

Lazy Gardener

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Central Maine, Zone 4B
It just slays me, all the tree hugging ninnies on FB. They post about how horrid it is to cut trees for lumber. Not a one of them would recognize a working forest if they were dropped in the middle of one. Nor would they recognize a neglected forest that has not been adequately harvested. Here, trees are weeds that must be managed.
 

Hinotori

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On the foot of Mt Rainier
A big problem is there are still morons who clear cut and leave ugly slash piles after they've also destroyed all the understory plants. Even here those piles last decades and the land takes forever to recover. There's a couple hundred acre property to the SW of us where some greedy jerk bought it, then clear cut all the trees about 2 decades ago. They then tried to sell it for the same price. No takers in all that time because it's way out of the Urban Growth Area and developera are the only ones who want cleared land. It Still looks like they just clear cut it other than invasive scotch broom has moved in. Some people see this and think it's how modern logging and forestry is still done.

Then you've got lumber places like Boise Cascade that manage forests and have huge tracts they use to basically farm trees. There is a rotation for cutting the lumber and the land isn't left barren. They clear stumps before replanting as those are used for hog fuel along with all the slash piles. It never looks dead.

I've also seen plenty of selective harvest happen around here on peoples properties. It's not very noticeable unless you watch it happen. Younger trees then have more room to grow.

Over on JBLM they selective harvest every year. Lumber is either used or sold. Then they offer permits to any service member to gather wood from the slash piles. Once they are down to just the smaller branches they chip it. They also do controlled burns of the forest regularly. There are rarely actual wildfires there and if there are, they only burn a couple acres at most before controlled. They simply can't burn fast because of the lack of fuel on the ground. Their forest is probably one of the best managed there is.
 

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