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WHAT ARE YOU CANNING TODAY?

Discussion in 'The Homestead Kitchen - Recipes Etc' started by Acre of Blessings, Aug 2, 2008.

  1. Sep 4, 2019
    wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Almost Self-Reliant

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    @Lazy Gardener
    If you are almost done canning for the season, just wait til next year to have the gauge tested. unless you plan on canning meat this fall.
    A friend gave me her pressure canner when I was just starting to can. She said that since the kids had grown up and left the nest, she would not be canning anymore. A friend of hers - who was a bossy, know-it-all and a "Master Gardener" heard that she gave me the canner and insisted that I take it in to be tested. To finally shut her up, I took it in and the lady laughed at me. "We don't test those - only the ones with a gauge". Yep, mine had the weight, no dial. I kept telling my friend that they don't test the weighted ones, but she didn't believe me.
     
    CLSranch and Beekissed like this.
  2. Sep 5, 2019
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    got 9 pints of Pozole canned up. Also started a batch of preserved limes (in foreground). Got a full load of tomatoes in the freeze dryer also.
    pozole.jpg
     
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  3. Sep 6, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Super Self-Sufficient

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    9 cups peach salsa, 12 cups of regular salsa. both batches too hot for my taste, but hubby should like them, as will my son, grand son... and a few other family members.
     
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  4. Sep 6, 2019
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    My wife is canning up garden salsa right now. She done several cases already this year.
     
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  5. Sep 12, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Super Self-Sufficient

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    Tonight, I'm finishing a batch of zucchini relish. Note to self. There is a very logical reason why pickles are soaked in brine over night, and finished in the morning. Soak over night: they can go outside in the cool of the evening, instead of jockeying stuff around in the fridge. Then... they can be finished off in the morning, instead of doing it in the evening when I am drop dead tired. I'm a very slow learner, it seems.

    Doing a cross between several recipes: Ball canning "Zesty with horseradish", vs. a more tame version I found on line. Leaving out the horseradish, and kicking up the nutmeg and turmeric, added a bit of hot pepper flakes. Cutting the sugar way back. Need to cut the sugar even more.
     
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  6. Sep 12, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Super Self-Sufficient

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    This morning, I prepped about 8 qt. of tomatoes to go in the jar. They will cook down a bit, and hopefully be in the jar before suppertime. More tomatoes ripening on the deck, more to pick. Would be good to have about 30 qt. of tomatoes in the jar, will most likely max out at 24.
     
    Hinotori likes this.
  7. Sep 12, 2019
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    Pulled out the last of the salad shrimp and the asparagus from the freeze dryer; the machine is defrosting now, and then we have to change the oil in the vacuum pump. Got a couple of quarts of serranos into the freezer (can't decide whether to leave them in the freezer or freeze-dry them). Now I have about a peck of bell peppers to chop up for the freeze dryer, several trays' worth of tomatoes to go into the dehydrator, and three quart size ziplocks of basil to process... probably a mix of pesto, basil salt, basil in oil, and freeze-dried.
     
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  8. Sep 12, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Super Self-Sufficient

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    Never heard of Pozole. Google turned this up. Does that compare to your recipe?

    https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/posole_rojo/
     
  9. Sep 12, 2019
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    Here is mine. It's a little different from the one you found, although it sounds like it would be good too. This was given to me by a Mexican neighbor several years ago. This is easy to double, triple... just depends on the size of your pot, lol.
    Mexican Pozole Recipe

    • 1 1/2 lbs pork shoulder
    • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
    • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
    • 1/4 teaspoon oregano
    • 1 tablespoon cumin powder
    • 1 onion, chopped
    • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
    • 2 tablespoons oil
    • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne
    • 2 tablespoons California chili powder
    • 1 tablespoon salt
    • 4 cups cauliflower florets, steamed until just tender ( I do this instead of the hominy)
    • 3-5 cups pork broth, from cooking pork shoulder
    • 1 cup canned diced green chilis
    • salt
    • 2 whole fresh jalapenos, chopped
    • 3 whole ancho chilies, seeded and stemmed (optional garnish, see below)

    Prepare the onion, peel the garlic, chop the onion, peel and chop the 2 garlic cloves, chop the green chilies and jalapenos and steam the cauliflower.

    Boil the ancho chilies in a separate small pot for the garnish part(read below).

    Place the meat in a large saucepan and just cover with lightly salted water.
    Add 1/2 chopped onion, the 2 cloves peeled garlic, pepper, cumin, and oregano.
    Bring to a boil over medium heat, skim off any foam that rises, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 45 minutes.

    Remove meat and broth, reserving both.

    Saute the remaining chopped onion and garlic in oil until translucent.
    Add the remaining spices, stir for a minute.
    Cut the reserved pork into 1-inch cubes and add to the pan.

    Stir in pork broth (if there is not enough pork broth, add chicken stock, green chilies and jalapenos.

    Cook at a simmer, covered, for 45 to 60 minutes until the meat is tender. If necessary, cook for up to an additional 60 minutes until the chilies and onions are well blended into the broth.

    Add the cauliflower and cook a few minutes so the cauliflower absorbs some of the flavor.

    Garnishes that were always served with this: lots of lime/lemon wedges. sliced radishes. chopped cilantro , cubed avocados, shredded cabbage (not red). fresh fried corn tortilla chips.


    (optional) When the ancho chilies are soft from boiling (takes about 15 minutes), then put them in the blender with 1 1/2cups of water, 1 clove of garlic and about 2 tablespoons diced onion, and about 1 tablespoons of salt and pepper. Blend this , then strain it to get the liquid separated from its "pulp". you can throw the pulp into the soup for the flavor or discard if too spicy for you. The remaining liquid you put in a serving dish for guests to add in their own bowl, if desired. Beware! It's HOT! (too hot for me, but DH likes it)
     
    sumi likes this.
  10. Sep 13, 2019
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    Yum - sounds delish!
     

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