Rammy's Rabbit Thread

Rammy

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You're not a bad bunny momma. A bad bunny momma would've turned her head and ignored the mats. Good on you for dealing with 'em! :)
I watched a few videos on brushing bunnies and they recommend not using dog brushes, but use a comb instead. I think I have a couple around here I can use to get some if the matts and loose hair out. So much to learn about rabbit care!
I did also clean thier resting matts, tiles, and scrubbed my one doe's cage out in the area she prefers to pee in. Of course, its in her covered area in the corner. Cant be out in the main area, nooooo. Messy bunny.
Buns probably wont like being brushed or combed, but too bad. Not going to have them get sores or fly strike because of bad bunny hair.
 

frustratedearthmother

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did also clean thier resting matts, tiles, and scrubbed my one doe's cage out in the area she prefers to pee in. Of course, its in her covered area in the corner. Cant be out in the main area, nooooo. Messy bunny.
Buns probably wont like being brushed or combed, but too bad. Not going to have them get sores or fly strike because of bad bunny hair.
And I thought bunnies were nearly care free. When you do it right - nothing is carefree - but healthy critters are worth it!
 

Daisy

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My buns love being brushed :) They just don't love being picked up for it! Rabbit skin tears easily so as long as you are gentle they may come to enjoy it. Its more important to brush them through a moult, to avoid too much hair ingestion, the rest of the time they are pretty good at cleaning themselves. I have almost as many brushes for my bunnies as I did my show horses :p Sounds like you are on the right track. I use a little battery powered clipper if matts are bad, its easier and safer than scissors. You're doing great keeping them alive in the heat, some really suffer with it.

My rabbits use a litter box, which could make for easier cleaning in the future for you. I never had to train them, they litter trained themselves. Mine are de-sexed though which might be why. Occasional "territory" poos elsewhere but the pee is always in the box.
 

Rammy

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I got the matts out of my red male this morning. He wasnt happy about it but I got it done. It's hard to do one-handed. He is shedding pretty good so I thought I would get one of those hand gloves for short haired dogs to use. When I was running my hand over him it was just pulling the hair out. I do have a soft bristle brush I use on cats. That would be ok for rabbits wouldn't it? Especially if I am gentle with it? I don't want him getting GI stasis from ingesting too much hair from shedding. I am going to work on the white buck later on this evening when it cools off.
 

baymule

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When I had show rabbits, I had a table to work with them on. It was at a height that was comfortable for me to stand at and not stoop over. I had a carpet sample for them to rest on, the table surface was formica and slick. To groom them, i had a spray bottle of water with a little glycerin added. I misted their fur lightly and rubbed my hands back and forth, cupped, over their body. The loose fur stuck to my hands, I rubbed hands together and rolled the fur off. Mist again, rub again. The rabbits enjoyed their massage, it kept them groomed and really helped when they blew their coats. I never used a brush.
 

Rammy

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I don't know where to get any glycerin. I feel bad they had matts and didnt realize it. Leo, the red buck, didn't blow his coat at all last year but he turned a year old in April. Im guessing April because he was supposed to be 12 weeks when I got him last July.
I know when I rub my hands over him the fur was coming off pretty good. The matts on thier hind quarters were pretty bad but I was able to get them off with the comb I had.
I had to hold Leo with one hand and kay him on his side to get the matts around his butt and tail. Maybe I can just mist him and get some hair off that way? They really dont get messed with other than when I have to trim nails or recently treated for what appeared to be possible ear mites.
Leo had been shaking his head off and on since I had him but I could never see anything in his ears til about 2 months ago. It looked like some black stuff deep in his ears. So he got the oil treatment for 2 weeks. Wasnt a happy camper.

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See his expression? :lol: I put him in a temporary hutch while I cleaned and scrubbed his hutch. I trimmed his nails, too.
 

baymule

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Yes, plain water will work. It makes the fur stick to your hands and shedding fur comes off. I used to keep chickens in my rabbitry to eat the dropped feed and fly larva, so the rabbits would sometimes get ear mites from the chickens. A monthly preventative dropper full of mineral oil kept the ear mites away!
 

Rammy

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Yes, plain water will work. It makes the fur stick to your hands and shedding fur comes off. I used to keep chickens in my rabbitry to eat the dropped feed and fly larva, so the rabbits would sometimes get ear mites from the chickens. A monthly preventative dropper full of mineral oil kept the ear mites away!
Oh, he wont like that! Haha!
 

farmerjan

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Glycerin can usually be found somewhere near cod liver oil and such. Our grocery store has glycerin on the aisle with "personal care products" like toiletries and such.
Believe it or not, we have used it on a rag when we rub down the chickens feathers before a show. Makes them shine.
 

Rammy

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This morning, I noticed that my Californian doe's ears were bare so I checked her ears for mites just in case. Didn't see anything but she wasn't happy about my looking and screamed bloody murder. I was looking at her thinking, "Really?"
What a drama queen.
 
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