MY LATEST DIY PROJECT

CrealCritter

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Do y'all hang your deer to skin by the back legs or the neck? I used to hang them from the back legs until my brother in law showed me hanging it by it's neck is way easier. Also gutting is a lot cleaner - no guts get caught up in the rib cage when hung by the neck. This doesn't really matter much though since I field dress them anyways.
 

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Do y'all hang your deer to skin by the back legs or the neck? I used to hang them from the back legs until my brother in law showed me hanging it by it's neck is way easier. Also gutting is a lot cleaner - no guts get caught up in the rib cage when hung by the neck. This doesn't really matter much though since I field dress them anyways.
Been hanging them by the neck since the late 70s, using the golf ball method of skinning, though we use a hammer instead of a golf ball. We field dress also, though now we drag it home first so the dogs and chickens can eat the gut pile.

With this chicken skinner clamp, it works like the golf ball method, which leaves little to no hair on the deer carcass. Skinning the birds off the butchering table leaves my butchering surface cleaner, gives me a carcass with no feather residue on it and a cleaner carcass all around. I'm loving it!

Also, now using a new way of gutting my chickens, which also speeds up the whole process.

I'm going to have my son devise me a chicken wringer, styled much like the rabbit wringer but for chickens. I'll be able to do dislocation of the neck, switch the bird around to hang it by the foot in the same apparatus for decapitation and a bleed out, then on to the skinning.

Right now, I'm also building me an outside sink setup that it movable, utilizing an old metal youth bed and an old sink, and may mount the skinner and wringer on the unit for ergonomics.
 
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Next project is building me a bed frame out of 4x4s. Though, it won't be me this time...my son has elected to do the build and says he doesn't need my help. Imagine that! :th

That will give me a chance to work on my outside sink setup...finally...though tomorrow through Fri. will be all about splitting firewood.
 

CrealCritter

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Next project is building me a bed frame out of 4x4s. Though, it won't be me this time...my son has elected to do the build and says he doesn't need my help. Imagine that! :th

That will give me a chance to work on my outside sink setup...finally...though tomorrow through Fri. will be all about splitting firewood.
Living the dream you are!!!

Have you thought about skinning fowl with a air compressor and needle valve?

 

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Hilarious! But, nope...hadn't thought of that. Wish I owned an air compressor so I could make chicken balloons. :D

Poor fella thinks squirrels are hard to skin....easy as skinning a rabbit.
 

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Finally got around to completing my outside sink, processing station. It's comprised of an old metal youth bed(headboard and footboard) and reclaimed/free lumber and an old single basin porcelain sink I got at the Rehab store for $4. The bed frame came from Good Will for $10.

Still have to add some bracing at the bottom, some paint and a few tweaks here and there but it's largely done. This is going to make my butchering SOOOO much easier as my current butchering station is our old picnic table, which is too low for good working and puts my back in a strain. Will post a pic when it's all finished.

It's not fancy but I'm tickled pink with it!

Next DIY is turning an old shipping crate I got at the Rehab store for $7 into a bench/potato storage for our pantry/mud room. That one's going to be really easy to just mount some legs and fashion a lid. It will be a welcome addition to the mudroom to be able to sit little girls down to remove their shoes and boots, etc. Also to have a place for potatoes...we've been keeping them in an old milk crate, which is not the best for keeping them fresh longer.
 

CrealCritter

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Was washing up the shipping crate yesterday, took a pic..doesn't it have a lovely glow?

All it needs now is rope handle on each side. I like it a lot rustic :)

I was at the farm store last week and took this picture. Thought about it and figured I could make the unfinished boxes for about $1.00 maximum but more like ¢.60 each really and I know I could bang out 100 a day with out breaking a sweat. Figured I could become rich :lol I'm actually amazed someone would buy one of those boxes for $10.00, well $9.99.
IMG_20171003_201027352.jpg
 

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